rc_keymap man page

rc_keymap — toml file describing remote control keymap

Description

An rc_keymap describes a remote control. It list the protocols used, and the mapping from decoded IR to linux input events. This file is used by ir-keytable(1) for IR decoding, and by ir-ctl(1) for sending IR.

The file format is toml. Since a remote control can use multiple protocols, the top level is an array of protocols. The vast majority of remotes only use one protocol.

Keymap Protocol Entry

For each protocol the remote uses, there should be one entry in the top level protocols array.

Name Field

Each protocols entry has a name field. The name is not used by ir-keytable, but can be used to give the remote control a more descriptive name than the file name, e.g. the model number.

Protocol Field

The protocol field specifies the protocol. This can either be one of the linux kernel decoders, in which case it is nec, rc-5, rc-6, jvc, sony, sanyo, rc-5-sz, sharp, mce-kbd, xmp, imon, rc-mm, other or unknown. If it does not match any of these entries, then it is assumed to be a BPF based decoder. The unknown and other are protocols decoded by specific RC devices where the protocol is either unknown or proprietary, respectively.

There are some pre-defined BPF protocol decoders, which are listed below. See https://lwn.net/Articles/759188/ for how to write your own.

Variant Field

The variant field specifies which variant a particular protocol uses. The sony, rc-5, rc-6 protocols have different bit length variants, for example. This field is not currently used. However, this is needed should the keymap be used for sending IR, rather than decoding it.

The following variants are currently defined:

Protocol rc-5 has variants rc-5, rc-5x-20, rc-5-sz.

Protocol nec has variants nec, nec-x, nec-32.

Protocol sony has variants sony-12, sony-15, sony-20.

Protocol rc-6 has variants rc-6-0, rc-6-6a-20, rc-6-6a-24, rc-6-6a-32, rc-6-mce.

Protocol rc-mm has variants rc-mm-12, rc-mm-24, and rc-mm-32.

Scancodes field

The scancodes table list the scancodes and the mapping to linux input key events. Multiple scancodes can map to the same key event. This field is not present for raw protocols.

If the scancode start with 0x, it is interpreted as a hexadecimal number. If it starts with a 0, it is interpreted as an octal number.

The key events are listed in the input-event-codes.h header file. Examples are KEY_ENTER, KEY_ESC or BTN_LEFT for the left mouse button.

Raw field

If the protocol is raw, the raw field is an array of keycode to raw mapping. For each entry, there is a keycode field and raw field. The keycode is a linux input event, as explained the scancodes section.

The raw field is an string, which lists pulse and space values, separated by whitespace. The first is a pulse value microseconds, and the second a space, third pulse, etc. The space values can be preceded by a - sign and the pulse value can be preceded by a +sign. There should be an odd number of value so that the last entry is a pulse.

Remaining fields (BPF parameters)

If the protocol is a BPF based decoder, it may have any number of numeric parameters. These parameters are used to support protocols with non-standard signaling lengths for standard IR protocols. Any other field specified here which is required by the selected BPF decoder will be used. All other fields are ignored.

Kernel based non-BPF protocol decoders do not have any parameters.

BPF Protocols

Some of the BPF protocol decoders are generic and will need parameters to work. Other are for specific remotes and should work without any parameters. The timing parameters are all in microseconds (µs).

raw

This decoder must be used when the keymap is raw; for each key, there is an entry in raw array with the pulse and space values for that key. No decoding is done, the incoming IR is simply matched against the different pulse and space values.

imon_rsc

This decoder is specifically for the iMON RSC remote, which was packaged with the iMON Station (amongst others). The decoder is for the directional stick in the middle; it will decode them into mouse movements. The buttons are all encoded using nec-x so the keymap needs two protocols to work correctly.

This is unrelated to the imon protocol.

margin

Define how much tolerance there is for message length. Default 200.

grundig

This decoder is specifically for old grundig remotes.

header_pulse

Length of first pulse, default 900.

header_space

Length of following space, default 2900.

leader_pulse

Length of second pulse, default 1300.

xbox

This decoder is specifically for the XBox Remote DVD, which is for the first generation XBox.

margin

Define how much tolerance there is for message length. Default 200.

manchester

Most manchester encoded remote controls are either rc-5, rc-6, or rc-mm. Some remote use a different variant (e.g. they might have a header pulse) and that is what the decoder is for. Some parameters must be specified, by default it is set up for rc-5.

margin

Define how much tolerance there is for message length. Default 200.

header_pulse

Define how long a leading pulse is. This is not always present. Default 0.

header_space

Define how long the space is after the leading pulse. Must be set if header_pulse is set.

zero_pulse, zero_space, one_pulse, one_space

Signally lengths for bits. See https://clearwater.com.au/code/rc5 for these are defined.

bits

Number of bits. Default 14.

scancode_mask

Bits to mask out of resulting scancode.

toggle_bit

Bit that specifies the toggle. If this value is greater than the number of bits, no toggle is defined.

pulse_distance

This is a generic decoder for protocols that define bits by distance between pulses, and the pulses are always of the same length. The most well known protocol like this is nec. This decoder is cases where nec is not used. The parameters must be set.

margin

Define how much tolerance there is for message length. Default 200.

header_pulse

Length of the first leading pulse. Default 2125.

header_space

Length of the space after the leading pulse. Default 1875.

repeat_pulse

Length of the leading pulse for key repeat. Default 0.

repeat_space

Length of the space after the leading pulse for key repeat. Default 0.

bit_pulse

Length of the pulse for each bit. Default 625.

bit_0_space

Length of the space for a zero bit. Default 375.

bit_1_space

Length of the space for a one bit. Default 1625.

trailer_pulse

Length of the pulse after the last bit. Needed to bookend the last bit. Default 625.

bits

Number of bits. Default 4.

reverse

Should the bits be read in least significant bit first. Set to non-zero to enable. Default 0.

header_optional

Some remotes do not send the header pulse and space for key repeats, so set this to non-zero to make the header optional. Default 0.

An alternative implementation might only allow missing headers for repeat messages, but this would fail to decode key presses if the first message with the header did not decode correctly to due interference.

pulse_length

This is a generic decoder for protocols that define bits by length of pulses, and the spaces are always the same. The sony protocol is the most well-known protocol, but this decoder is for protocols which are not sony.

margin

Define how much tolerance there is for message length. Default 200.

header_pulse

Length of the first leading pulse. Default 2125.

header_space

Length of the space after the leading pulse. Default 1875.

repeat_pulse

Length of the leading pulse for key repeat. Default 0.

repeat_space

Length of the space after the leading pulse for key repeat. Default 0.

bit_space

Length of the space for each bit. Default 625.

bit_0_pulse

Length of the pulse for a zero bit. Default 375.

bit_1_pulse

Length of the pulse for a one bit. Default 1625.

trailer_pulse

Length of the pulse after the last bit. Optional. Default 0.

bits

Number of bits. Default 4.

reverse

Should the bits be read in least significant bit first. Set to non-zero to enable. Default 0.

header_optional

Some remotes do not send the header pulse and space for key repeats, so set this to non-zero to make the header optional. Default 0.

An alternative implementation might only allow missing headers for repeat messages, but this would fail to decode key presses if only the first message did not decode correctly to due interference.

Example

[[protocols]]
name = "iMON Station RSC"
protocol = "nec"
variant = "necx"
[protocols.scancodes]
0x801010 = "KEY_EXIT"
0x80102f = "KEY_POWER"
0x80104a = "KEY_SCREENSAVER"
0x801049 = "KEY_TIME"
0x801054 = "KEY_NUMERIC_1"
0x801055 = "KEY_NUMERIC_2"
0x801056 = "KEY_NUMERIC_3"
0x801057 = "KEY_NUMERIC_4"
0x801058 = "KEY_NUMERIC_5"
0x801059 = "KEY_NUMERIC_6"
0x80105a = "KEY_NUMERIC_7"
0x80105b = "KEY_NUMERIC_8"
0x80105c = "KEY_NUMERIC_9"
0x801081 = "KEY_SCREEN"
0x80105d = "KEY_NUMERIC_0"
0x801082 = "KEY_MAX"
0x801048 = "KEY_ESC"
0x80104b = "KEY_MEDIA"
0x801083 = "KEY_MENU"
0x801045 = "KEY_APPSELECT"
0x801084 = "KEY_STOP"
0x801046 = "KEY_CYCLEWINDOWS"
0x801085 = "KEY_BACKSPACE"
0x801086 = "KEY_KEYBOARD"
0x801087 = "KEY_SPACE"
0x80101e = "KEY_RESERVED"
0x801098 = "BTN_0"
0x80101f = "KEY_TAB"
0x80101b = "BTN_LEFT"
0x80101d = "BTN_RIGHT"
0x801016 = "BTN_MIDDLE"
0x801088 = "KEY_MUTE"
0x80105e = "KEY_VOLUMEDOWN"
0x80105f = "KEY_VOLUMEUP"
0x80104c = "KEY_PLAY"
0x80104d = "KEY_PAUSE"
0x80104f = "KEY_EJECTCD"
0x801050 = "KEY_PREVIOUS"
0x801051 = "KEY_NEXT"
0x80104e = "KEY_STOP"
0x801052 = "KEY_REWIND"
0x801053 = "KEY_FASTFORWARD"
0x801089 = "KEY_ZOOM"
[[protocols]]
protocol = "imon_rsc"

Bugs

Report bugs to Linux Media Mailing List <linux-media@vger.kernel.org>

See Also

ir-keytable(1) and ir-ctl(1)

https://lwn.net/Articles/759188/

https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/include/uapi/linux/input-event-codes.h#n64

Info

Thu Mar 7 2019 v4l-utils 1.18.0 File Formats