radsecproxy.conf man page

radsecproxy.conf — Radsec proxy configuration file

Description

When the proxy server starts, it will first check the command line arguments, and then read the configuration file. Normally radsecproxy will read the configuration file /etc/radsecproxy.conf. The command line -c option can be used to instead read an alternate file (see radsecproxy(1) for details).

If the configuration file can not be found, the proxy will exit with an error message. Note that there is also an include facility so that any configuration file may include other configuration files. The proxy will also exit on configuration errors.

Configuration Syntax

When the configuration file is processed, whitespace (spaces and tabs) are generally ignored. For each line, leading and trailing whitespace are ignored. A line is ignored if it is empty, only consists of whitespace, or if the first non-whitespace character is a #. The configuration is generally case insensitive, but in some cases the option values (see below) are not.

There are two types of configuration structures than can be used. The first and simplest are lines on the format option value. That is, an option name, see below for a list of valid options, followed by whitespace (at least one space or tab character), followed by a value. Note that if the value contains whitespace, then it must be quoted using "" or ''. Any whitespace in front of the option or after the value will be ignored.

The other type of structure is a block. A block spans at least two lines, and has the format:

blocktype name {
	option value
	option value
	...
}

That is, some blocktype, see below for a list of the different block types, and then enclosed in braces you have zero or more lines that each have the previously described option value format. Different block types have different rules for which options can be specified, they are listed below. The rules regarding white space, comments and quotes are as above. Hence you may do things like:

blocktype name {
#    option value
    option "value with space"
    ...
}

Option value characters can also be written in hex for options requiring a string type value. This is done by writing the character % followed by two hexadecimal digits. If a % is used without two following hexadecimal digits, the % and the following characters are used as written. If you want to write a % and not use this decoding, you may of course write % in hex; i.e., %25. As %00 would terminate a string, this value is not converted in most cases, except when used with rewrite statements or secrets.

Some options allow or require the use of regular expressions, denoted as regex. The POSIX extended RE system is used, see re_format(7).

There is one special option that can be used both as a basic option and inside all blocks. That is the option Include where the value specifies files to be included. The value can be a single file, or it can use normal shell globbing to specify multiple files, e.g.:

include /etc/radsecproxy.conf.d/*.conf

The files are sorted alphabetically. Included files are read in the order they are specified, when reaching the end of a file, the next file is read. When reaching the end of the last included file, the proxy returns to read the next line following the Include option. Included files may again include other files.

Basic Options

The following basic options may be specified in the configuration file. Note that blocktypes and options inside blocks are discussed later. Note that none of these options are required, and indeed in many cases they are not needed. Note that you should specify each at most once. The behaviour with multiple occurrences is undefined.

PidFile file

The PidFile option specifies the name of a file to which the process id (PID) will be written. This is overridden by the -i command line option. There is no default value for the PidFile option.

LogLevel 1-5

This option specifies the debug level. It must be set to 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, where 1 logs only serious errors, and 5 logs everything. The default is 2 which logs errors, warnings and a few informational messages. Note that the command line option -d overrides this.

LogDestination (file|syslog)

This specifies where the log messages should go. By default the messages go to syslog with facility LOG_DAEMON. Using this option you can specify another syslog facility, or you may specify that logging should be to a particular file, not using syslog. The value must be either a file or syslog URL. The file URL is the standard one file:///var/log/radsecproxy/radsecproxy.log, specifying a local file that should be used. For syslog, you must use the syntax: x-syslog:///FACILITY where FACILITY must be one of LOG_DAEMON, LOG_MAIL, LOG_USER, LOG_LOCAL0, LOG_LOCAL1, LOG_LOCAL2, LOG_LOCAL3, LOG_LOCAL4, LOG_LOCAL5, LOG_LOCAL6or LOG_LOCAL7. You may omit the facility from the URL to specify logging to the default facility, but this is not very useful since this is the default log destination. Note that this option is ignored if -f is specified on the command line.

LogThreadId (on|off)

This can be set to on to include the thread-id in the log messages (useful for debugging).

LogFullUsername (on|off)

This can be set to off to only log the realm in Access-Accept/Reject log messages (for privacy).

LogMAC opt

The LogMAC option can be used to control if and how Calling-Station-Id (the users Ethernet MAC address) is being logged. It can be set to one of Static, Original, VendorHashed, VendorKeyHashed, FullyHashed or FullyKeyHashed. The default value for LogMAC is Original.

See radsecproxy.conf-example for details.

LogKey key

The LogKey option is used to specify the key to use when producing HMAC's as an effect of specifying VendorKeyHashed or FullyKeyHashed for the LogMAC option.

FTicksReporting fticks

The FTicksReporting option is used to enable F-Ticks logging and can be set to None, Basic or Full. Its default value is None. If FTicksReporting is set to anything other than None, note that the default value for FTicksMAC needs FTicksKey to be set.

See radsecproxy.conf-example for details.

FTicksMAC opt

The FTicksMAC option has the same function as LogMAC for FTicks. The default for FTicksMAC is VendorKeyHashed which needs FTicksKey to be set.

Before choosing any of Original, FullyHashed or VendorHashed, consider the implications for user privacy when MAC addresses are collected. How will the logs be stored, transferred and accessed?

FTicksKey key

The FTicksKey option has the same function as LogKey for Fticks.

FTicksSyslogFacility syslog

The FTicksSyslogFacility option is used to specify a dedicated syslog facility for F-Ticks messages. This allows for easier filtering of F-Ticks messages. If no FTicksSyslogFacility option is given, F-Ticks messages are written to what the LogDestination option specifies.

F-Ticks messages are always logged using the log level LOG_DEBUG. Note that specifying a file in FTicksSyslogFacility (using the file:/// prefix) is not supported.

FTicksPrefix prefix

The FTicksPrefix option is used to set the prefix printed in F-Ticks messages. This allows for use of F-Ticks messages in non-eduroam environments. If no FTicksPrefix option is given, it defaults to the prefix used for eduroam (F-TICKS/eduroam/1.0).

ListenUDP (address|*)[:port]
ListenTCP (address|*)[:port]
ListenTLS (address|*)[:port]
ListenDTLS (address|*)[:port]

Listen for the address and port for the respective protocol. Normally the proxy will listen to the standard ports if configured to handle clients with the respective protocol. The default ports are 1812 for UDP and TCP and 2083 for TLS and DTLS. On most systems it will do this for all of the system's IP addresses (both IPv4 and IPv6). On some systems however, it may respond to only IPv4 or only IPv6. To specify an alternate port you may use a value on the form *:port where port is any valid port number. If you also want to specify a specific address you can do e.g. 192.168.1.1:1812 or [2001:db8::1]:1812. The port may be omitted if you want the default one. Note that you must use brackets around the IPv6 address. These options may be specified multiple times to listen to multiple addresses and/or ports for each protocol.

SourceUDP (address|*)[:port]
SourceTCP (address|*)[:port]
SourceTLS (address|*)[:port]
SourceDTLS (address|*)[:port]

This can be used to specify source address and/or source port that the proxy will use for connecting to clients to send messages (e.g. Access Request). The same syntax as for Listen... applies.

TTLAttribute (attr|vendor:attr)

This can be used to change the default TTL attribute. Only change this if you know what you are doing. The syntax is either a numerical value denoting the TTL attribute, or two numerical values separated by column specifying a vendor attribute.

AddTTL 1-255

If a TTL attribute is present, the proxy will decrement the value and discard the message if zero. Normally the proxy does nothing if no TTL attribute is present. If you use the AddTTL option with a value 1-255, the proxy will, when forwarding a message with no TTL attribute, add one with the specified value. Note that this option can also be specified for a client/server which will override this setting when forwarding a message to that client/server.

LoopPrevention (on|off)

When this is enabled (on), a request will never be sent to a server named the same as the client it was received from. I.e., the names of the client block and the server block are compared. Note that this only gives limited protection against loops. It can be used as a basic option and inside server blocks where it overrides the basic setting.

IPv4Only (on|off)
IPv6Only (on|off)

Enabling IPv4Only or IPv6Only (on) makes radsecproxy resolve DNS names to the corresponding address family only, and not the other. This is done for both clients and servers. At most one of IPv4Only and IPv6Only can be enabled. Note that this can be overridden in client and server blocks, see below.

Include file

This is not a normal configuration option; it can be specified multiple times. It can both be used as a basic option and inside blocks. For the full description, see the configuration syntax section above.

Blocks

There are five types of blocks, they are client, server, realm, tls and rewrite. At least one instance of each of client and realm is required for the proxy to do anything useful, and it will exit if none are configured. The tls block is required if at least one TLS/DTLS client or server is configured. Note that there can be multiple blocks for each type. For each type, the block names should be unique. The behaviour with multiple occurrences of the same name for the same block type is undefined. Also note that some block option values may reference a block by name, in which case the block name must be previously defined. Hence the order of the blocks may be significant.

Client Block

client (name|fqdn|(address[/length])) {
	...
}

The client block is used to configure a client. That is, tell the proxy about a client, and what parameters should be used for that client. The name of the client block must (with one exception, see below) be either the IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) of the client, an IP prefix (IPv4 or IPv6) on the form IpAddress/PrefixLength, or a domain name (FQDN). The way an FQDN is resolved into an IP address may be influenced by the use of the IPv4Only and IPv6Only options. Note that literal IPv6 addresses must be enclosed in brackets.

If a domain name is specified, then this will be resolved immediately to all the addresses associated with the name, and the proxy will not care about any possible DNS changes that might occur later. Hence there is no dependency on DNS after startup. However, if the name can not be resolved, startup will fail.

When some client later sends a request to the proxy, the proxy will look at the IP address the request comes from, and then go through all the addresses of each of the configured clients (in the order they are defined), to determine which (if any) of the clients this is. When using the IpAddress/PrefixLength form, this might mask clients defined later, which then will never be matched.

In the case of TLS/DTLS, the name of the client must match the FQDN or IP address in the client certificate (CN or SubectAltName:DNS or SubjectAltName:IP respectively). Note that this is not required when the client name is an IP prefix. If overlapping clients are defined (see section above), they will be searched for matching MatchCertificateAttribute, but they must reference the same tls block.

The allowed options in a client block are:

Host (fqdn|(address[/length]))

Alternatively of specifying the FQDN or address in the block name,  the host option may be used. In that case, the value of the host option is used as described above, while the name of the block is only used as a descriptive name for the administrator. The host option may be used multiple times, and can be a mix of addresses, FQDNs and prefixes.

IPv4Only (on|off)
IPv6Only (on|off)

Enabling IPv4Only or IPv6Only (on) makes radsecproxy resolve DNS names to the corresponding address family only, and not the other. At most one of IPv4Only and IPv6Only can be enabled. Note that this will override the global option for this client.

Type type

Specify the type (protocol) of the client. Available options are UDP, TCP, TLS and DTLS.

Secret secret

Use secret as the shared RADIUS key with this client. If the secret contains whitespace, the value must be quoted. This option is optional for TLS/DTLS and if omitted will default to "radsec". (Note that using a secret other than "radsec" for TLS is a violation of the standard (RFC 6614) and that the proposed standard for DTLS stipulates that the secret must be "radius/dtls".)

TLS tls

For a TLS/DTLS client you may also specify the tls option. The option value must be the name of a previously defined TLS block. If this option is not specified, the TLS block with the name defaultClient or default will be used if defined (in that order). If the specified TLS block name does not exist, or the option is not specified and none of the defaults exist, the proxy will exit with an error.

CertificateNameCheck (on|off)

For a TLS/DTLS client, disable the default behaviour of matching CN or SubjectAltName against the specified hostname or IP address.

matchCertificateAttribute ( CN | SubjectAltName:URI | SubjectAltName:DNS ) :/regexp/
MatchCertificateAttribute SubjectAltName:IP:address

Perform additional validation of certificate attributes. Currently matching of CN and SubjectAltName types URI DNS and IP is supported. Note that currently this  option can only be specified once in a client block.

DuplicateInterval seconds

Specify for how many seconds duplicate checking should be done. If a proxy receives a new request within a few seconds of a previous one, it may be treated the same if from the same client, with the same authenticator etc. The proxy will then ignore the new request (if it is still processing the previous one), or returned a copy of the previous reply.

AddTTL 1-255

The AddTTL option has the same meaning as the option used in the basic config. See the Basic Options section for details. Any value configured here overrides the basic one when sending messages to this client.

TCPKeepalive (on|off)

Enable TCP keepalive (default is off). If keepalives are not answered within 30s the connection is considered lost.

FticksVISCOUNTRY cc

Sets this client to be eligible to F-Ticks logging as defined by the FTicksReporting basic option, and specifies the country to be reported. The country should be specified by the two-letter country code.

FticksVISINST institution

Set the institution to report in F-Ticks logging. If this option is omitted, the name of the client block is used.

Rewrite rewrite

This option is deprecated. Use rewriteIn instead.

RewriteIn rewrite
RewriteOut rewrite

Apply the operations in the specified rewrite block on incoming (request) or outgoing (response) messages from this client. Rewriting incoming messages is done before, outgoing after other processing. If the RewriteIn is not configured, the rewrite blocks defaultClient or default will be applied if defined. No default blocks are applied for RewriteOut.

RewriteAttribute User-Name:/regex/replace/

Rewrite the User-Name attribute in a client request for the request forwarded by the proxy. The User-Name attribute is written back to the original value if a matching response is later sent back to the client. Example usage:

RewriteAttribute User-Name:/^(.*)@local$/\1@example.com/

Server Block

server (name|((fqdn|address)[:port])) {
	...
}

The server block is used to configure a server. That is, tell the proxy about a server, and what parameters should be used when communicating with that server. The name of the server block must (with one exception, see below) be either the IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) of the server, or a domain name (FQDN). If a domain name is specified, then this will be resolved immediately to all the addresses associated with the name, and the proxy will not care about any possible DNS changes that might occur later. Hence there is no dependency on DNS after startup. If the domain name resolves to multiple addresses, then for UDP/DTLS the first address is used. For TCP/TLS, the proxy will loop through the addresses until it can connect to one of them. The way an FQDN is resolved into an IP address may be influenced by the use of the IPv4Only and IPv6Only options.

In the case of TLS/DTLS, the name of the server must match the FQDN or IP address in the server certificate.

Note that the fqdn or address may include a port number (separated with a column). This port number will then override the default port or a port option in the server block. Also note that literal IPv6 addresses must be enclosed in brackets.

The allowed options in a server block are:

Host (fqdn|address)[:port]

Alternatively of specifying the FQDN or address in the block name the host option may be used. In that case, the value of the host option is used as described above, while the name of the block is only used as a descriptive name for the administrator. Note that multiple host options may be used. This will then be treated as multiple names/addresses for the same server. When initiating a TCP/TLS connection, all addresses of all names may be attempted, but there is no failover between the different host values. For failover use separate server blocks.

Port port

Specify the port (UDP/TCP) to connect to. If omitted, UDP and TCP will default to 1812 while TLS and DTLS will default to 2083.

DynamicLookupCommand command

Execude the command to dynamically configure a server. The executable file should be given with full path and will be invoked with the name of the realm as its first and only argument. It should either print a valid server {...} option on stdout and exit with a code of 0 or print nothing and exit with a non-zero exit code.

If the command exited with 0 an provided a valid server config, it will be combined with the statements in this server block, with the values returned by the command taking preference.

An example of a shell script resolving the DNS NAPTR records for the realm and then the SRV records for each NAPTR matching 'x-eduroam:radius.tls' is provided in tools/naptr-eduroam.sh.

StatusServer (on|off|minimal|auto)

Enable the use of status-server messages for this server (default off).  If statusserver is enabled (on), the proxy will send regular status-server messages to the server to verify that it is alive. Status tracking of the server will solely depend on status-server message and ignore lost requests. This should only be enabled if the server supports it. With the option minimal status-server messages are only sent when regular requests have been lost and no other replies have been received.

The option auto tries to detect whether the other server supports status-server. If so, status-server messages are enabled in minimal mode.

RetryCount count

Set how many times the proxy should retry sending a request to the server. Default is 2 retries. Please note that Radius retries are normally done by the NAS.

RetryInterfval interval

Set the interval between each retry. Default is 5s.

Rewrite rewrite

This option is deprecated. Use rewriteIn instead.

RewriteOut rewrite
RewriteIn rewrite

Apply the operations in the specified rewrite block on outgoing (request) or incoming (response) messages to/from this server. Rewriting outgoing messages is done after, incoming before other processing. If the RewriteIn is not configured, the rewrite blocks defaultServer or default will be applied if defined. No default blocks are applied for RewriteOut.

LoopPrevention (on|off)

This overrides the global LoopPrevention option for this server. See section Basic Options for details on this option.

The meaning and syntax of the following options are exactly the same as for the client block. The details are not repeated here. Please refer to the definitions in the Client Block section.

IPv4Only (on|off)
IPv6Only (on|off)
Type type
Secret secret
TLS tls
CertificateNameCheck (on|off)
matchCertificateAttribute ( CN | SubjectAltName:URI | SubjectAltName:DNS ) :/regexp/
MatchCertificateAttribute SubjectAltName:IP:address
AddTTL 1-255
TCPKeepalive (on|off)

Realm Block

realm (*|realm|/regex/) {
	...
}

When the proxy receives an Access-Request it needs to figure out to which server it should be forwarded. This is done by looking at the Username attribute in the request, and matching that against the names of the defined realm blocks. The proxy will match against the blocks in the order they are specified, using the first match if any. If no realm matches, the proxy will simply ignore the request. Each realm block specifies what the server should do when a match is found.

The allowed options in a realm block are:

Server server
AccountingServer server

Specify the server to which requests for this realm should be forwarded. server references a previously defined server block (see the Server Block section). Each server and accountingServer can be specified multiple times, or omitted completely. If no server is configured, the proxy will deny all Access-Requests for this realm. If no accountingServer is configured, the proxy will silently ignore all Accounting-Requests for this realm. See the Server Selection section below for details.

AccountingResponse (on|off)

Enable sending Accounting-Response instead of ignoring Accounting-Requests when no accoutingServer are configured.

ReplyMessage message

Specify a message to be sent back to the client if a Access-Request is denied because no server are configured.

Realm Block Names and Matching

In the general case the proxy will look for a @ in the username attribute, and try to do an exact, case insensitive match between what comes after the @ and the name of the realm block. So if you get a request with the attribute value anonymous@example.com, the proxy will go through the realm names in the order they are specified, looking for a realm block named example.com.

There are two exceptions to this, one is the realm name * which means match everything. Hence if you have a realm block named *, then it will always match. This should then be the last realm block defined, since any blocks after this would never be checked. This is useful for having a default.

The other exception is regular expression matching. If the realm name starts with a /, the name is treated as an regular expression. A case insensitive regexp match will then be done using this regexp on the value of the entire Username attribute. Optionally you may also have a trailing / after the regexp. So as an example, if you want to use regexp matching the domain example.com you could have a realm block named /@example\.com$/. If you want to match all domains under the .com top domain, you could do /@.*\.com$/. Note that since the matching is done on the entire attribute value, you can also use rules like /^[a-k].*@example\.com$/ to get some of the users in this domain to use one server, while other users could be matched by another realm block and use another server.

Server Selection

Normally requests will be forwarded to the first server option defined. If there are multiple server options, the proxy will do fail-over and use the second server if the first is down. If the two first are down, it will try the third etc. If the first server comes back up, it will go back to using that one. Detection of servers being up or down is based on the use of StatusServer (if enabled), and that TCP/TLS/DTLS connections are up. Otherwise unanswered requests are used to detect unresponsive servers. AccountingServers are treated the same, but independently of the other servers.

If there is no Server option, the proxy will if ReplyMessage is specified, reply back to the client with an Access Reject message. The message contains a replyMessage attribute with the value as specified by the ReplyMessage option. Note that this is different from having no match since then the request is simply ignored.  This can be used to catch all undefined sub-domains or even all undefined realms by configuring either a regex match like /@.*\.example\.com/ or the realm * with no server option. Another use-case is to block a specific pattern in the username or realm part using  a regex.

If there is no AccountingServer option, the proxy will normally do nothing, ignoring accounting requests. If instead AccountingResponse is set to on, the proxy will log some of the accounting information and send an Accounting-Response back. This stops clients from retransmitting Accounting-Request messages when a realm has no accountingServer configured.

TLS Block

tls name {
	...
}

The TLS block specifies TLS configuration options and you need at least one of these if you have clients or servers using TLS/DTLS. As discussed in the client and server block descriptions, a client or server block may reference a particular TLS block by name. There are also however the special TLS block names default, defaultClient and defaultServer which are used as defaults if the client or server block does not reference a TLS block. Also note that a TLS block must be defined before the client or server block that would use it. If you want the same TLS configuration for all TLS/DTLS clients and servers, you need just a single tls block named default, and the client and servers need not refer to it. If you want all TLS/DTLS clients to use one config, and all TLS/DTLS servers to use another, then you would be fine only defining two TLS blocks named defaultClient and defaultServer. If you want different clients (or different servers) to have different TLS parameters, then you may need to create other TLS blocks with other names, and reference those from the client or server definitions.

As both clients and servers need to present and verify a certificate, both a certificate as well as a CA to verify the peers certificate  must be configured.

The allowed options in a tls block are:

CACertificateFile file

The CA certificate file used to verify the peers certificate.

CACertificatePath path

The path to search for CA or intermediate certificates.

CertificateFile file

The server certificate this proxy will use. The file may also contain a certificate chain.

CertificateKeyFile file

The private-key file for the server certificate specified in CACertificateFile.

CertificateKeyPassword password

The password to decrypt the private-key.

PolicyOID oid

Require the peers certificate to adhere to the policy specified by oid. This can be specified multiple times.

CRLCheck (on|off)

Enable checking peer certificate against the CRL (default off).
Note that radsecproxy does not fetch the CRLs itslef. This has to be done  separately, e.g. with fetch-crl(8)

CacheExpiry seconds

Specify how many seconds the CA and CRL information should be cached. By default, the CA and CRL are loaded at startup and cached indefinetely. After the configured time, the CA CRL are re-read. Alternatively, reloading the CA and CRL can be triggered by sending a SIGHUP to the radsecproxy process. This option may be set to zero to disable caching.

Rewrite Block

rewrite name {
	...
}

The rewrite block specifies rules that may rewrite RADIUS messages. It can be used to add, remove and modify specific attributes from messages received from and sent to clients and servers. As discussed in the client and server block descriptions, a client or server block may reference a particular rewrite block by name. There are however also the special rewrite block names default, defaultClient and defaultServer which are used as defaults if the client or server block does not reference a block. Also note that a rewrite block must be defined before the client or server block that would use it. If you want the same rewrite rules for input from all clients and servers, you need just a single rewrite block named default, and the client and servers need not refer to it. If you want all clients to use one config, and all servers to use another, then you would be fine only defining two rewrite blocks named defaultClient and defaultServer. Note that these defaults are only used for rewrite on input. No rewriting is done on output unless explicitly specified using the RewriteOut option.

The rewrite actions are performed in this sequence:

1. RemoveAttribute (or WhitelistAttribute)
2. ModifyAttribute
3. SupplementAttribute
4. AddAttribute

All options can be specified multiple times. The allowed options in a rewrite block are:

AddAttribute attribute:value

Add an attribute to the radius message and set it to value. The attribute must be specified using the numerical attribute id. The value can either be numerical, a string, or a hex value. If the value starts with a number, it is interpreted as a 32bit unsigned integer.  Use the ' character at the start of the value to force string interpretation. When using hex value, it is recommended to also lead with ' to avoid unintended numeric interpretation. See the Configuration Syntax section for further details.

AddVendorAttribute vendor:subattribute:value

Add a vendor attribute to the radius message, specified by vendor and subattribute. Both vendor and subattribute must be specified as numerical values. The format of value is the same as for addAttribute above.

SupplementAttribute attribute:value

Add an attribute to the radius message and set it to value, only if the  attribute is not yet present on the message.  The format of value is the same as for addAttribute above.

SupplementVendorAttribute vendor:subattribute:value

Add a vendor attribute to the radius message only if the subattribute of this vendor is not yet present on the message. The format of is the same as for addVendorAttribute above.

ModifyAttribute attribute:/regex/replace/

Modify the given attribute using the regex replace pattern. As above, attribute must be specified by a numerical value. Example usage:

modifyAttribute 1:/^(.*)@local$/\1@example.com/

ModifyVendorAttribute vendor:subattribute:/regex/replace/

Modify the given subattribute of given vendor using the regex replace pattern.  Other than the added vendor, the same syntax as for ModifyAttribute applies.

RemoveAttribute attribute

Remove all attributes with the given id.

RemoveVendorAttribute vendor[:subattribute]

Remove all vendor attributes that match the given vendor and subattribute. If the subattribute is omitted, all attributes with the given vendor id are removed.

WhitelistMode (on|off)

Enable whitelist mode. All attributes except those configured with WhitelistAttrbiute or WhitelistVendorAttribute will be removed. While whitelist mode is active, RemoveAttribute and RemoveVendorAttribute statements are ignored.

WhitelistAttribute attribute

Do not remove attributes with the given id when WhitelistMode is on. Ignored otherwise.

WhitelistVendorAttribute vendor[:subattribute]

Do not remove vendor attributes that match the given vendor and subattribute when WhitelistMode is on. Ignored otherwise.

If the subattribute is omitted, the complete vendor attribute is whitelisted. Otherwise only the specified subattribute is kept but all other subattributes are removed.

See Also

radsecproxy(1)

Referenced By

radsecproxy(1), radsecproxy-hash(1).

2019-10-01 radsecproxy 1.8.1