rtla-timerlat-top - Man Page

Measures the operating system timer latency

Synopsis

rtla timerlat top [Options] ...

Description

The rtla timerlat tool is an interface for the timerlat tracer. The timerlat tracer dispatches a kernel thread per-cpu. These threads set a periodic timer to wake themselves up and go back to sleep. After the wakeup, they collect and generate useful information for the debugging of operating system timer latency.

The timerlat tracer outputs information in two ways. It periodically prints the timer latency at the timer IRQ handler and the Thread handler. It also enable the trace of the most relevant information via osnoise: tracepoints.

The rtla timerlat top displays a summary of the periodic output from the timerlat tracer. It also provides information for each operating system noise via the osnoise: tracepoints that can be seem with the option -T.

Options

-a,  --auto us

Set the automatic trace mode. This mode sets some commonly used options while debugging the system. It is equivalent to use -T us -s us -t. By default, timerlat tracer uses FIFO:95 for timerlat threads, thus equilavent to -P f:95.

-p,  --period us

Set the timerlat tracer period in microseconds.

-i,  --irq us

Stop trace if the IRQ latency is higher than the argument in us.

-T,  --thread us

Stop trace if the Thread latency is higher than the argument in us.

-s,  --stack us

Save the stack trace at the IRQ if a Thread latency is higher than the argument in us.

--dma-latency us

Set the /dev/cpu_dma_latency to us, aiming to bound exit from idle latencies. cyclictest sets this value to 0 by default, use --dma-latency 0 to have similar results.

-q,  --quiet

Print only a summary at the end of the session.

-c,  --cpus cpu-list

Set the osnoise tracer to run the sample threads in the cpu-list.

-d,  --duration time[s|m|h|d]

Set the duration of the session.

-D,  --debug

Print debug info.

-t,  --trace[=file]

Save the stopped trace to [file|osnoise_trace.txt].

-e,  --event sys:event

Enable an event in the trace (-t) session. The argument can be a specific event, e.g., -e sched:sched_switch, or all events of a system group, e.g., -e sched. Multiple -e are allowed. It is only active when -t or -a are set.

--filter <filter>

Filter the previous -e sys:event event with <filter>. For further information about event filtering see https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/trace/events.html#event-filtering.

--trigger <trigger>

Enable a trace event trigger to the previous -e sys:event. If the hist: trigger is activated, the output histogram will be automatically saved to a file named system_event_hist.txt. For example, the command:

rtla <command> <mode> -t -e osnoise:irq_noise --trigger="hist:key=desc,duration/1000:sort=desc,duration/1000:vals=hitcount"

Will automatically save the content of the histogram associated to osnoise:irq_noise event in osnoise_irq_noise_hist.txt.

For further information about event trigger see https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/trace/events.html#event-triggers.

-P,  --priority o:prio|r:prio|f:prio|d:runtime:period

Set scheduling parameters to the osnoise tracer threads, the format to set the priority are:

  • o:prio - use SCHED_OTHER with prio;
  • r:prio - use SCHED_RR with prio;
  • f:prio - use SCHED_FIFO with prio;
  • d:runtime[us|ms|s]:period[us|ms|s] - use SCHED_DEADLINE with runtime and period in nanoseconds.
-h,  --help

Print help menu.

Example

In the example below, the timerlat tracer is set to capture the stack trace at the IRQ handler, printing it to the buffer if the Thread timer latency is higher than 30 us. It is also set to stop the session if a Thread timer latency higher than 30 us is hit. Finally, it is set to save the trace buffer if the stop condition is hit:

[root@alien ~]# rtla timerlat top -s 30 -t 30 -T
                 Timer Latency
  0 00:00:59   |          IRQ Timer Latency (us)        |         Thread Timer Latency (us)
CPU COUNT      |      cur       min       avg       max |      cur       min       avg       max
  0 #58634     |        1         0         1        10 |       11         2        10        23
  1 #58634     |        1         0         1         9 |       12         2         9        23
  2 #58634     |        0         0         1        11 |       10         2         9        23
  3 #58634     |        1         0         1        11 |       11         2         9        24
  4 #58634     |        1         0         1        10 |       11         2         9        26
  5 #58634     |        1         0         1         8 |       10         2         9        25
  6 #58634     |       12         0         1        12 |       30         2        10        30 <--- CPU with spike
  7 #58634     |        1         0         1         9 |       11         2         9        23
  8 #58633     |        1         0         1         9 |       11         2         9        26
  9 #58633     |        1         0         1         9 |       10         2         9        26
 10 #58633     |        1         0         1        13 |       11         2         9        28
 11 #58633     |        1         0         1        13 |       12         2         9        24
 12 #58633     |        1         0         1         8 |       10         2         9        23
 13 #58633     |        1         0         1        10 |       10         2         9        22
 14 #58633     |        1         0         1        18 |       12         2         9        27
 15 #58633     |        1         0         1        10 |       11         2         9        28
 16 #58633     |        0         0         1        11 |        7         2         9        26
 17 #58633     |        1         0         1        13 |       10         2         9        24
 18 #58633     |        1         0         1         9 |       13         2         9        22
 19 #58633     |        1         0         1        10 |       11         2         9        23
 20 #58633     |        1         0         1        12 |       11         2         9        28
 21 #58633     |        1         0         1        14 |       11         2         9        24
 22 #58633     |        1         0         1         8 |       11         2         9        22
 23 #58633     |        1         0         1        10 |       11         2         9        27
timerlat hit stop tracing
saving trace to timerlat_trace.txt
[root@alien bristot]# tail -60 timerlat_trace.txt
[...]
    timerlat/5-79755   [005] .......   426.271226: #58634 context thread timer_latency     10823 ns
            sh-109404  [006] dnLh213   426.271247: #58634 context    irq timer_latency     12505 ns
            sh-109404  [006] dNLh313   426.271258: irq_noise: local_timer:236 start 426.271245463 duration 12553 ns
            sh-109404  [006] d...313   426.271263: thread_noise:       sh:109404 start 426.271245853 duration 4769 ns
    timerlat/6-79756   [006] .......   426.271264: #58634 context thread timer_latency     30328 ns
    timerlat/6-79756   [006] ....1..   426.271265: <stack trace>
=> timerlat_irq
=> __hrtimer_run_queues
=> hrtimer_interrupt
=> __sysvec_apic_timer_interrupt
=> sysvec_apic_timer_interrupt
=> asm_sysvec_apic_timer_interrupt
=> _raw_spin_unlock_irqrestore                        <---- spinlock that disabled interrupt.
=> try_to_wake_up
=> autoremove_wake_function
=> __wake_up_common
=> __wake_up_common_lock
=> ep_poll_callback
=> __wake_up_common
=> __wake_up_common_lock
=> fsnotify_add_event
=> inotify_handle_inode_event
=> fsnotify
=> __fsnotify_parent
=> __fput
=> task_work_run
=> exit_to_user_mode_prepare
=> syscall_exit_to_user_mode
=> do_syscall_64
=> entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe
=> 0x7265000001378c
=> 0x10000cea7
=> 0x25a00000204a
=> 0x12e302d00000000
=> 0x19b51010901b6
=> 0x283ce00726500
=> 0x61ea308872
=> 0x00000fe3
          bash-109109  [007] d..h...   426.271265: #58634 context    irq timer_latency      1211 ns
    timerlat/6-79756   [006] .......   426.271267: timerlat_main: stop tracing hit on cpu 6

In the trace, it is possible the notice that the IRQ timer latency was already high, accounting 12505 ns. The IRQ delay was caused by the bash-109109 process that disabled IRQs in the wake-up path (_try_to_wake_up() function). The duration of the IRQ handler that woke up the timerlat thread, informed with the osnoise:irq_noise event, was also high and added more 12553 ns to the Thread latency. Finally, the osnoise:thread_noise added by the currently running thread (including the scheduling overhead) added more 4769 ns. Summing up these values, the Thread timer latency accounted for 30328 ns.

The primary reason for this high value is the wake-up path that was hit twice during this case: when the bash-109109 was waking up a thread and then when the timerlat thread was awakened. This information can then be used as the starting point of a more fine-grained analysis.

Note that rtla timerlat was dispatched without changing timerlat tracer threads' priority. That is generally not needed because these threads hava priority FIFO:95 by default, which is a common priority used by real-time kernel developers to analyze scheduling delays.

See Also

rtla-timerlat(1), rtla-timerlat-hist(1)

timerlat tracer documentation: <https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/trace/timerlat-tracer.html>

Author

Written by Daniel Bristot de Oliveira <bristot@kernel.org>

Reporting Bugs

Report bugs to <linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org> and <linux-trace-devel@vger.kernel.org>

License

rtla is Free Software licensed under the GNU GPLv2

Copying

Copyright (C) 2021 Red Hat, Inc. Free use of this software is granted under the terms of the GNU Public License (GPL).

Referenced By

rtla-timerlat(1), rtla-timerlat-hist(1).