rpkg-macros - Man Page

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Rpkg macro reference

NOTE:

rpkg macro is a bash function that outputs to stdout certain part of rpm spec file. Don't confuse it with rpm macro which is part of the rpm spec file syntax itself. Essentially, rpkg macro is something that can output an rpm macro (or even a sequence of them) to stdout. rpkg macros are intended to be translated into their respective stdouts (in other words, "executed") by preproc utility and you will therefore see them in a spec file enclosed triple braces (e.g. {{{ <macro_name> }}}) which are the preproc specific tags used to differentiate macro invocations from the normal text.

Examples

Example spec file with the rpkg macros used:

Name:       {{{ git_dir_name }}}
Version:    {{{ git_dir_version }}}
Release:    1%{?dist}

Summary:    This is a test package.
VCS:        {{{ git_dir_vcs }}}

License:    GPLv2+
URL:        https://someurl.org

Source0:    {{{ git_dir_pack }}}

%description
This is a test package.

%prep
{{{ git_dir_setup_macro }}}

%changelog
{{{ git_dir_changelog }}}

Other examples can be found online at the addresses below. You can experiment with those by using rpkg tool which understands those spec files and can translate them to regular spec files.

https://pagure.io/hello_rpkg/blob/master/f/hello_rpkg.spec.rpkg https://pagure.io/hello_rpkg_release/blob/master/f/hello_rpkg.spec.rpkg

Base Git Macros

Those macros provide the base implementation for other macro types like e.g. git_dir macros (see later in this document). They can be, however, used directly as well. Unless otherwise specified in their description, they operate on git repository top-level for the current working directory.

Output of every base git macro call is cached and other macros are made to take those cached values into account by default. You can see that a macro uses a cached value as an input parameter default value by looking at its function header definition and searching for the OUTPUT keyword.

E.g.

git_version [name="${OUTPUT[git_name]}"] [lead=0] [follow=]

Default value for name in this definition is derived from the cached output of the previously invoked git_name macro or its derivative, e.g. git_dir_name (in which case, the cache key is still git_name). If git_name macro or its derivative has not been invoked or if its output was an empty string, the default value for the name= parameter above will be also an empty string.

"Subpackage" in the definitions below is a set of annotated tags with a common Name. Such set of tags in a git project usually corresponds to a certain (sub)directory with a spec file in it.

----

git_name [name=] [prepend=] [append=]

Without any parameters, looks up remote URL for the currently active branch and outputs its basename with .git suffix stripped. If the remote URL could not be determined, "origin" remote URL is used instead.

Optional arguments:
name

the base name to be output

prepend

string to be prepended to the base name

append

string to be appended to the base name

----

git_version [name="${OUTPUT[git_name]}"] [lead=0] [follow=]

Outputs version of a subpackage given by name. The version is computed from the current commit, state of the work tree, and also from the latest** reachable annotated tag of N-V-R form (N-V-R stands for the Name-Version-Release rpm triplet) with a matching Name (i.e. equal to ${name}) and Lead (but only if lead parameter is non-empty). Lead is defined as a substring of Version before the last dot (note that for the git_release macro below, it is defined as substring of Release before the last dot, instead). Complementary to Lead, there is Follow which is the version part of the tag after the last dot.

The version string that git_version produces is generally composed of the following parts (some of those parts might end up empty in certain cases):

${lead}.${follow}${commit_count_appendix}${dirty_appendix}

lead is a major version substring. By default, it is set to zero. It is intended to be manually incremented on API/ABI changes. It can contain multiple components separated by dot (e.g. 2.1).

If lead parameter is set to empty, its value will be automatically derived from Lead of the latest (reachable) annotated tag for the subpackage given by name. If there is no such tag, lead will be empty and the dot after it will not be rendered.

follow is a minor version substring. It can contain only a single component (i.e. it cannot contain any dots).

If follow parameter is empty, it will be obtained from Follow of the latest tag of a matching Name and also Lead if lead parameter is non-empty. If there is no such tag, the resulting follow will be 0.

commit_count_appendix is generated only if the current commit is not tagged for the given subpackage. It is composed of the following parts:

.git.${commit_count}.${current_commit_short_hash}

commit_count is a number of commits from the latest tag to the current commit for the given subpackage.

current_commit_short_hash is a short (8-chars long) hash of the current commit.

dirty_appendix is generated only if the currently checked out work tree is dirty. It is composed of the following parts:

.dirty.${encoded_latest_file_status_change_time}

encoded_latest_file_status_change_time is an encoded time of the latest file status change that happened in the work tree. That way we can have the version increased each time we make a change in our work tree without committing.

Optional arguments:
name

name of a subpackage

lead

major version substring, dynamically derived if set to empty

follow

minor version substring, dynamically derived if not specified

Environment variables:

VERSION_BUMP: if set to a non-empty value, the following procedure is applied to get the version string:

If follow is specified by user explicitly, output ${lead}.${follow}.

Otherwise, extract follow from the latest tag of a matching Name and Lead (if lead is non-empty) as the last version component (the component after the last dot of Version) and output ${lead}.${follow}+1.  If the extracted ${follow} is not a number, throw an error (manual setting of follow is needed in this case).

NOTE: rpkg command-line utility sets the VERSION_BUMP variable into the preprocessing environment during execution of rpkg tag subcommand. Otherwise, it is unset.

** "latest" is defined by a topological sort as the first criterion and rpm version sort as the second (supplementary) criterion where the topological sort is not enough to decide. The tool that implements this sorting algorithm is called rpm-git-tag-sort. Note that in this article, we sometimes say only "the latest tag" while the real meaning is "the latest reachable annotated tag" (i.e. "reachable" and "annotated" is always implied).

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git_release [name="${OUTPUT[git_name]}"] [lead=] [follow=]

Outputs release of a subpackage given by ${name}. The release string contains the same parts as the version string for git_version:

${lead}.${follow}${commit_count_appendix}${dirty_appendix}

and is computed in a similar fashion to the version string, i.e. based on the current commit, state of the work tree, and based on the latest reachable annotated tag of N-V-R form with a matching Name and Lead if lead is non-empty.

For git_release, however, we extract all the information from the Release part of that tag. In other words, Lead, lead, and follow relate to Release for this macro but otherwise their meaning stays the same as for git_version (i.e. Lead is the part of a version string before the last dot, lead is used to match against Lead, follow, if specified, is used instead of Follow of the latest tag).

Additionally, lead (the input parameter, therefore lowercase 'l', as opposed to Lead - the tag substring) is empty by default for git_release.

Optional arguments:
name

name of a subpackage

lead

major version substring, dynamically derived if not specified

follow

minor version substring, dynamically derived if not specified

Environment variables:

RELEASE_BUMP: if set to a non-empty value, the same procedure is applied to get a bumped value as for git_version except we again apply the terms Lead, lead, and follow to Release instead of Version. Please, see git_version above for more information.

NOTE: rpkg utility sets the RELEASE_BUMP variable into the preprocessing environment during execution of rpkg tag subcommand. Otherwise, it is unset.

----

git_release_branched

Uses the current branch name as lead parameter for git_release. In other words, equivalent of:

git_release lead="$GIT_BRANCH"

NOTE: the output value will be cached under git_release, not under git_release_branched.

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git_changelog [name="${OUTPUT[git_name]}"] [since_tag=] [until_tag=] [header_locale=POSIX] [header_date_format="%a %b %d %Y"] [body_wrap=80]

Outputs rpm spec changelog as generated from tag messages for the subpackage given by name.

Optional arguments:
name

name of the subpackage to generate the changelog for

since_tag

start the changelog records with this tag

until_tag

end the changelog records with this tag

header_locale

locale to be used when changelog record date is being generated

header_date_format

date format to be used in the changelog record headers

body_wrap

maximum allowed line length for changelog body

NOTE: When rpkg tag is called, it allows you to specify a tag message. This is the message that will be used as a changelog record body.

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git_vcs path=

Outputs pseudo repository URL pointing to the respective path in the currently checked out tree. Ideally, the output should contain a publicly available clone URL as a substring when this macro is used for production purposes.

Example output:

git+https://pagure.io/test-project.git#dadef2a8b9554e94797a7336261192e02d5d9351:subdir

Required arguments:
path

path to a subtree to generate the URL for

----

git_pack path= [dir_name=] [source_name=]

Packs the whole work tree content into a gzipped source tarball and outputs ${source_name} which is a filename of the created tarball. It omits submodules, untracked and also git-ignored content. While submodules are being omitted when on subpath of the given path, you can actually point the path into a submodule (e.g. into its top-level directory), in which case, the submodule content will be packed obeying the same rules as when the parent's git repository own path would be packed.

If work tree is dirty, it uses GNU tar to do the job but if the tree is clean, git_pack actually becomes a proxy to git_archive macro below and instead treeish from the current commit is used as the source content instead of the work tree (the two contents are the same at this point, however). The reason is that git archive packing method has an advantage that the resulting tarball will have a PAX header identifying the source commit (see man git-get-tar-commit-id), which can be later used for package verification and further processing. This method allows packing from a dirty tree for testing purposes while producing trackable, production-ready archives when work tree is clean.

Required arguments:
path

path to a specific subdirectory to be packed

Optional arguments:
dir_name

top-level directory name in the created tarball

source_name

filename of the created source tarball

Environment variables:

OUTDIR: if empty, git_pack will not generate any sources, only the source filename will be output, otherwise determines where to put the generated tarball

NOTE: rpkg utility sets OUTDIR, only if the tarball is actually needed to be generated. It does not set it when just rpkg spec is called (without any additional arguments).

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git_archive path= [dir_name=] [source_name=]

Packs the latest commit tree content into a gzipped source tarball and output ${source_name}, which is a filename of the created tarball. Uses git archive to do the job. The result will contain a PAX header with the commit ID from which the tarball was created. This information can be later extracted by git-get-tar-commit-id.

Required arguments:
path

path to a specific subdirectory to be packed

Optional arguments:
dir_name

top-level directory name in the created tarball

source_name

filename of the created source tarball

Environment variables:

OUTDIR: if empty, git_archive will not generate any sources, only the source filename will be output, otherwise determines where to put the generated tarball

NOTE: rpkg utility sets OUTDIR, only if the tarball is actually needed to be generated. It does not set it when rpkg spec is called (without any additional arguments).

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git_setup_macro [dir_name=] [path=] [source_indices=0]

Outputs %setup rpm macro call with the appropriate parameters for the given path or dir_name. This will unpack one or multiple source tarballs defined by the Source definitions in a spec file. This macro is primarily designed to be called in %prep section of spec file to unpack sources for %build phase.

Either dir_name or path needs to be specified. This macro is complementary to git_pack and git_archive macros and is assumed to be used if one of those macros is used in a spec file.

Optional arguments:
dir_name

name of the top-level directory in the source-tarball

path

path from which dir_name is derived if it is not specified

source_indices

Source numbers separated by comma to generate the %setup macro for, by default 0

Git_dir Macros

These macros operate on a directory level. In particular, on a directory where the input spec file is located. The location of the spec file is assumed to be stored in INPUT_PATH environment variable. There is also INPUT_DIR_PATH which stores path to the directory where the spec file is located (i.e. INPUT_PATH with the last component stripped).

In essence, the git_dir macros are tiny wrappers over the base git macros which are being invoked with some input parameters set specifically for the spec-file's subdirectory operation.

The git_dir macros have the same input parameters as the respective base git macros and the values specified by user are directly passed down to the base macros and will also override values of those parameters that the derived macro sets itself (you will see those parameters in the definitions below).

NOTE: the git_dir macros are the recommended ones to use from all the macro types. Use them unless you would need to override a value that the the macro sets itself. In that case, the base git macros are a better choice.

NOTE: rpkg utility allows you to specify the INPUT_PATH environment variable through --spec <path> argument for certain rpkg subcommands that support it.

Below you can see to what the git_dir macros expand. Passing all input parameters down to the base git macro, if any are specified, is implicit (i.e. not mentioned below).

----

git_dir_name

    git_name append="$(git_prefix "$INPUT_DIR_PATH" | git_prefix_to_name_suffix)"

Outputs remote URL basename appended with the path (after slash to dash substitution) from the repository root to the spec file's directory.

----

git_dir_version

    git_version name="$(git_dir_name)"

Outputs version of a subpackage by name $(git_dir_name).

----

git_dir_release

    git_release name="$(git_dir_name)"

Outputs release of a subpackage by name $(git_dir_name).

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git_dir_release_branched

    git_release_branched name="$(git_dir_name)"

Outputs branched release of a subpackage by name $(git_dir_name).

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git_dir_changelog

    git_changelog name="$(git_dir_name)"

Outputs changelog of a subpackage by name $(git_dir_name).

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git_dir_vcs

    git_vcs path="$INPUT_DIR_PATH"

Outputs VCS pseudo URL pointing to the spec file's subdirectory.

----

git_dir_pack

    git_pack path="$INPUT_DIR_PATH"

Packs spec file's subdirectory by using GNU tar (for a dirty repo) or git archive (for a clean repo).

----

git_dir_archive

    git_archive path="$INPUT_DIR_PATH"

Packs spec file's subdirectory by using git archive.

----

git_dir_setup_macro

    git_setup_macro path="$INPUT_DIR_PATH"

Outputs rpm's %setup macro with dir_name (-n argument of %setup) generated according to the remote URL basename and the spec file's subdirectory path. If you used git_dir_pack or git_dir_archive for packing, use this macro in %prep spec file section for preparing the sources for rpm build.

Git_cwd Macros

Similarly to git_dir macros, these macros operate on a directory level. In this case, it is the current working directory (obtained from PWD environment variable). These macros are, in fact, just tiny wrappers over the base git macros with some input parameters specifically set for operation on the current working directory.

NOTE: With rpkg utility, you can influence the working dir from the command line by explicitly specifying its --path argument.

Below you can see to what the git_cwd macros expand. Passing all input parameters down to the base git macro, if any are specified, is implicit (i.e. not mentioned below).

----

git_cwd_name

    git_name append="$(git_prefix "$PWD" | git_prefix_to_name_suffix)"

Outputs remote URL basename appended with the path from the repository root to the current working directory (after slash to dash substitution).

----

git_cwd_version

    git_version name="$(git_cwd_name)"

Outputs version of a subpackage by name $(git_cwd_name).

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git_cwd_release

    git_release name="$(git_cwd_name)"

Outputs release of a subpackage by name $(git_cwd_name).

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git_cwd_release_branched

    git_release_branched name="$(git_cwd_name)"

Outputs branched release of a subpackage by name $(git_cwd_name).

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git_cwd_changelog

    git_changelog name="$(git_cwd_name)"

Outputs changelog of a subpackage by name $(git_cwd_name).

----

git_cwd_vcs

    git_vcs path="$PWD"

Outputs VCS pseudo URL pointing to the current working directory.

----

git_cwd_pack

    git_pack path="$PWD"

Packs working directory by using GNU tar (for a dirty repo) or git archive (for a clean repo).

----

git_cwd_archive

    git_archive path="$PWD"

Packs working directory by using git archive.

----

git_cwd_setup_macro

    git_setup_macro path="$PWD"

Outputs rpm's %setup macro with dir_name (-n argument of %setup) automatically generated according to the remote URL basename and the current working directory path. If you used git_cwd_pack or git_cwd_archive for packing, use this macro in %prep spec file section for preparing the sources for rpm build.

Git_repo Macros

These macros operate on the root (top-level) directory of the current git repository. Path to that directory is stored in GIT_ROOT environment variable. Implementation-wise, these macros are just tiny wrappers over the git base macros with some input values set specifically for repository-wide operation.

WARNING:

If your local git repository is not properly initialized or if, for example, the .git metadata directory in your local tree has been renamed or removed, operation of the repo macros can get out of the intended scope. It is therefore recommended to use more specific git_dir_* macros wherever possible, which are always bound to the directory where the input spec file is located. This is especially important for the tarball creating macros (i.e. *_pack and *_archive ones).

Below you can see to what the git_repo macros expand. Passing all input parameters down to the base git macro, if any are specified, is implicit (i.e. not mentioned below).

----

git_repo_name

    git_name

Outputs remote URL basename with .git suffix stripped. git_repo_name and git_name are direct equivalents.

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git_repo_version

    git_version name="$(git_repo_name)"

Outputs version of a subpackage by name $(git_repo_name).

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git_repo_release

    git_release name="$(git_repo_name)"

Outputs release of a subpackage by name $(git_repo_name).

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git_repo_release_branched

    git_release_branched name="$(git_repo_name)"

Outputs branched release of a subpackage by name $(git_repo_name).

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git_repo_changelog

    git_changelog name="$(git_repo_name)"

Outputs changelog of a subpackage by name $(git_repo_name).

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git_repo_vcs

    git_vcs path="$GIT_ROOT"

Outputs VCS pseudo URL pointing to the repository.

----

git_repo_pack

    git_pack path="$GIT_ROOT"

Packs the whole repository (with the standard omissions like git-ignored content or git submodules, see documentation for git_pack regarding this) by using GNU tar (for a dirty repo) or git archive (for a clean repo).

----

git_repo_archive

    git_archive path="$GIT_ROOT"

Packs the git repository content by using git archive.

----

git_repo_setup_macro

    git_setup_macro path="$GIT_ROOT"

Outputs rpm's %setup macro with dir_name (-n argument of %setup) generated from basename of the repository remote URL. If you used git_repo_pack or git_repo_archive for packing, use this macro in %prep spec file section for preparing the sources for rpm build.

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