pepc - Man Page

Synopsis

pepc [-h] [-q] [-d] [--version] [-H HOSTNAME] [-U USERNAME] [-K PRIVKEY] [-T TIMEOUT] [-D DATASET] [--force-color] {cpu-hotplug,cstates,pstates,aspm,topology} ...

Description

pepc - Power, Energy, and Performance Configuration tool for Linux.

Options

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--version

Print version and exit.

-H HOSTNAME, --host HOSTNAME

Name of the host to run the command on.

-U USERNAME, --username USERNAME

Name of the user to use for logging into the remote host over SSH. The default user name is 'root'.

-K PRIVKEY, --priv-key PRIVKEY

Path to the private SSH key that should be used for logging into the remote host. By default the key is automatically found from standard paths like '~/.ssh'.

-T TIMEOUT, --timeout TIMEOUT

SSH connect timeout in seconds, default is 8.

-D DATASET, --dataset DATASET

This option is for debugging and testing purposes only, it defines the dataset that will be used to emulate a host for running the command on. Please, specify dataset path or name. In the latter case, it will be searched for in the following locations: /home/abityuts/powerlab/git/pepc/pepctool/tests/data, $PEPC_DATA_PATH/tests/data, $HOME/.local/share/pepc/tests/data, /usr/local/share/pepc/tests/data, /usr/share/pepc/tests/data. Use 'all' to specify all available datasets.

--force-color

Force coloring of the text output.

Commands

pepc cpu-hotplug

CPU online/offline commands.

pepc cstates

CPU C-state commands.

pepc pstates

P-state commands.

pepc aspm

PCI ASPM commands.

pepc topology

CPU topology commands.

COMMAND 'pepc cpu-hotplug'

usage: pepc cpu-hotplug [-h] [-q] [-d] {info,online,offline} ...

CPU online/offline commands.

OPTIONS 'pepc cpu-hotplug'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

FURTHER SUB-COMMANDS 'pepc cpu-hotplug'

pepc cpu-hotplug info

List online and offline CPUs.

pepc cpu-hotplug online

Bring CPUs online.

pepc cpu-hotplug offline

Bring CPUs offline.

COMMAND 'pepc cpu-hotplug info'

usage: pepc cpu-hotplug info [-h] [-q] [-d]

List online and offline CPUs.

OPTIONS 'pepc cpu-hotplug info'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

COMMAND 'pepc cpu-hotplug online'

usage: pepc cpu-hotplug online [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS]

Bring CPUs online.

OPTIONS 'pepc cpu-hotplug online'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to online. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs.

COMMAND 'pepc cpu-hotplug offline'

usage: pepc cpu-hotplug offline [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--ht-siblings]

Bring CPUs offline.

OPTIONS 'pepc cpu-hotplug offline'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to offline. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs.

--cores CORES

Same as '--cpus', but specifies list of cores.

--packages PACKAGES

Same as '--cpus', but specifies list of packages.

--ht-siblings

Offline core siblings, making sure there is only one logical CPU per core is left online. The sibling CPUs will be searched for among the CPUs selected with '--cpus', '--cores', and '--packages'. Therefore, specifying '--cpus all --ht- siblings' will effectively disable hyper-threading on Intel CPUs.

COMMAND 'pepc cstates'

usage: pepc cstates [-h] [-q] [-d] {info,config,save,restore} ...

Various commands related to CPU C-states.

OPTIONS 'pepc cstates'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

FURTHER SUB-COMMANDS 'pepc cstates'

pepc cstates info

Get CPU C-states information.

pepc cstates config

Configure C-states.

pepc cstates save

Save C-states settings.

pepc cstates restore

Restore C-states settings.

COMMAND 'pepc cstates info'

usage: pepc cstates info [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--yaml] [--cstates [CATATES]] [--pkg-cstate-limit] [--c1-demotion] [--c1-undemotion] [--c1e-autopromote] [--cstate-prewake] [--idle-driver]
                        [--governor]

Get information about C-states on specified CPUs. By default, prints all information for all CPUs. Remember, this is information about the C-states that Linux can request, they are not necessarily the same as the C-states supported by the underlying hardware.

OPTIONS 'pepc cstates info'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to get information about. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to get information about. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to get information about. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all packages.

--yaml

Print information in YAML format.

--cstates [CATATES]

Comma-separated list of C-states to get information about (all C-states by default). C-states should be specified by name (e.g., 'C1'). Use 'all' to specify all the available Linux C-states (this is the default). Note, there is a difference between Linux C-states (e.g., 'C6') and hardware C-states (e.g., Core C6 or Package C6 on many Intel platforms). The former is what Linux can request, and on Intel hardware this is usually about various 'mwait' instruction hints. The latter are platform-specific hardware state, entered upon a Linux request..

--pkg-cstate-limit

Get package C-state limit. The deepest package C-state the platform is allowed to enter. The package C-state limit is configured via MSR {MSR_PKG_CST_CONFIG_CONTROL:#x} (MSR_PKG_CST_CONFIG_CONTROL). This model-specific register can be locked by the BIOS, in which case the package C-state limit can only be read, but cannot be modified. This option has package scope.

--c1-demotion

Get current setting for c1 demotion. Allow/disallow the CPU to demote C6/C7 requests to C1. This option has core scope.

--c1-undemotion

Get current setting for c1 undemotion. Allow/disallow the CPU to un-demote previously demoted requests back from C1 to C6/C7. This option has core scope.

--c1e-autopromote

Get current setting for c1E autopromote. When enabled, the CPU automatically converts all C1 requests to C1E requests. This CPU feature is controlled by MSR 0x1fc, bit 1. This option has package scope.

--cstate-prewake

Get current setting for c-state prewake. When enabled, the CPU will start exiting the C6 idle state in advance, prior to the next local APIC timer event. This CPU feature is controlled by MSR 0x1fc, bit 30. This option has package scope.

--idle-driver

Get idle driver. Idle driver is responsible for enumerating and requesting the C-states available on the platform. This option has global scope.

--governor

Get idle governor. Idle governor decides which C-state to request on an idle CPU. This option has global scope.

COMMAND 'pepc cstates config'

usage: pepc cstates config [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--enable [CSTATES]] [--disable [CSTATES]] [--pkg-cstate-limit [PKG_CSTATE_LIMIT]] [--c1-demotion [C1_DEMOTION]]
                          [--c1-undemotion [C1_UNDEMOTION]] [--c1e-autopromote [C1E_AUTOPROMOTE]] [--cstate-prewake [CSTATE_PREWAKE]] [--governor [GOVERNOR]]

Configure C-states on specified CPUs. All options can be used without a parameter, in which case the currently configured value(s) will be printed.

OPTIONS 'pepc cstates config'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to configure. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to configure. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to configure. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all packages.

--enable [CSTATES]

Comma-separated list of C-states to enable. C-states should be specified by name (e.g., 'C1'). Use 'all' to specify all the available Linux C-states (this is the default). Note, there is a difference between Linux C-states (e.g., 'C6') and hardware C-states (e.g., Core C6 or Package C6 on many Intel platforms). The former is what Linux can request, and on Intel hardware this is usually about various 'mwait' instruction hints. The latter are platform-specific hardware state, entered upon a Linux request..

--disable [CSTATES]

Similar to '--enable', but specifies the list of C-states to disable.

--pkg-cstate-limit [PKG_CSTATE_LIMIT]

Set package C-state limit. The deepest package C-state the platform is allowed to enter. The package C-state limit is configured via MSR {MSR_PKG_CST_CONFIG_CONTROL:#x} (MSR_PKG_CST_CONFIG_CONTROL). This model-specific register can be locked by the BIOS, in which case the package C-state limit can only be read, but cannot be modified. This option has package scope.

--c1-demotion [C1_DEMOTION]

Enable or disable c1 demotion. Allow/disallow the CPU to demote C6/C7 requests to C1. Use "on" or "off". This option has core scope.

--c1-undemotion [C1_UNDEMOTION]

Enable or disable c1 undemotion. Allow/disallow the CPU to un-demote previously demoted requests back from C1 to C6/C7. Use "on" or "off". This option has core scope.

--c1e-autopromote [C1E_AUTOPROMOTE]

Enable or disable c1E autopromote. When enabled, the CPU automatically converts all C1 requests to C1E requests. This CPU feature is controlled by MSR 0x1fc, bit 1. Use "on" or "off". This option has package scope.

--cstate-prewake [CSTATE_PREWAKE]

Enable or disable c-state prewake. When enabled, the CPU will start exiting the C6 idle state in advance, prior to the next local APIC timer event. This CPU feature is controlled by MSR 0x1fc, bit 30. Use "on" or "off". This option has package scope.

--governor [GOVERNOR]

Set idle governor. Idle governor decides which C-state to request on an idle CPU. This option has global scope.

COMMAND 'pepc cstates save'

usage: pepc cstates save [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [-o OUTFILE]

Save all the modifiable C-state settings into a file. This file can later be used for restoring C-state settings with the 'pepc cstates restore' command.

OPTIONS 'pepc cstates save'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to save C-state information about. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to save C-state information about. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to save C-state information about. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword

-o OUTFILE, --outfile OUTFILE

Name of the file to save the settings to.

COMMAND 'pepc cstates restore'

usage: pepc cstates restore [-h] [-q] [-d] [-f INFILE]

Restore C-state settings from a file previously created with the 'pepc cstates save' command.

OPTIONS 'pepc cstates restore'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

-f INFILE, --from INFILE

Name of the file restore the settings from (use "-" to read from the standard output.

COMMAND 'pepc pstates'

usage: pepc pstates [-h] [-q] [-d] {info,config,save,restore} ...

Various commands related to P-states (CPU performance states).

OPTIONS 'pepc pstates'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

FURTHER SUB-COMMANDS 'pepc pstates'

pepc pstates info

Get P-states information.

pepc pstates config

Configure P-states.

pepc pstates save

Save P-states settings.

pepc pstates restore

Restore P-states settings.

COMMAND 'pepc pstates info'

usage: pepc pstates info [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--yaml] [--min-freq] [--max-freq] [--min-freq-limit] [--max-freq-limit] [--base-freq] [--min-freq-hw] [--max-freq-hw] [--min-oper-freq]
                        [--max-eff-freq] [--turbo] [--max-turbo-freq] [--min-uncore-freq] [--max-uncore-freq] [--min-uncore-freq-limit] [--max-uncore-freq-limit] [--hwp] [--epp] [--epp-hw] [--epb] [--epb-hw] [--driver]
                        [--intel-pstate-mode] [--governor]

Get P-states information for specified CPUs. By default, prints all information for all CPUs.

OPTIONS 'pepc pstates info'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to get information about. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to get information about. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to get information about. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all packages.

--yaml

Print information in YAML format.

--min-freq

Get min. CPU frequency. Minimum CPU frequency is the lowest frequency the operating system configured the CPU to run at (via sysfs knobs). The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "hfm", "base", "P1" - base CPU frequency, "max" - maximum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs), "eff", "lfm", "Pn" - maximum CPU efficiency frequency. This option has CPU scope.

--max-freq

Get max. CPU frequency. Maximum CPU frequency is the highest frequency the operating system configured the CPU to run at (via sysfs knobs). The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "hfm", "base", "P1" - base CPU frequency, "max" - maximum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs), "eff", "lfm", "Pn" - maximum CPU efficiency frequency. This option has CPU scope.

--min-freq-limit

Get min. supported CPU frequency. Minimum supported CPU frequency is the lowest frequency supported by the operating system (reported via sysfs knobs). This option has CPU scope.

--max-freq-limit

Get max. supported CPU frequency. Maximum supported CPU frequency is the maximum CPU frequency supported by the operating system (reported via sysfs knobs). This option has CPU scope.

--base-freq

Get base CPU frequency. Base CPU frequency is the highest sustainable CPU frequency. This frequency is also referred to as "guaranteed frequency", HFM (High Frequency Mode), or P1. The base frequency is acquired from a sysfs file of from an MSR register, if the sysfs file does not exist. This option has CPU scope.

--min-freq-hw

Get min. CPU frequency (OS bypass). Minimum frequency the CPU is configured by the OS to run at. This value is read directly from the MSR(s), bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--max-freq-hw

Get max. CPU frequency (OS bypass). Maximum frequency the CPU is configured by the OS to run at. This value is read directly from the MSR(s), bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--min-oper-freq

Get min. CPU operating frequency. Minimum operating frequency is the lowest possible frequency the CPU can operate at. Depending on the CPU model, this frequency may or may not be directly available to the operating system, but the platform may use it in certain situations (e.g., in some C-states). This frequency is also referred to as Pm. Min. operating frequency is acquired from an MSR register, bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--max-eff-freq

Get max. CPU efficiency frequency. Maximum efficiency frequency is the most energy efficient CPU frequency. This frequency is also referred to as LFM (Low Frequency Mode) or Pn. Max. efficiency frequency is acquired from an MSR register, bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--turbo

Get current setting for turbo. When turbo is enabled, the CPUs can automatically run at a frequency greater than base frequency. Turbo on/off status is acquired and modified via sysfs knobs. This option has global scope.

--max-turbo-freq

Get max. CPU turbo frequency. Maximum 1-core turbo frequency is the highest frequency a single CPU can operate at. This frequency is also referred to as max. 1-core turbo and P01. It is acquired from an MSR register, bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--min-uncore-freq

Get min. uncore frequency. Minimum uncore frequency is the lowest frequency the operating system configured the uncore to run at. The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "max" - maximum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs). This option has die scope.

--max-uncore-freq

Get max. uncore frequency. Maximum uncore frequency is the highest frequency the operating system configured the uncore to run at. The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "max" - maximum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs). This option has die scope.

--min-uncore-freq-limit

Get min. supported uncore frequency. Minimum supported uncore frequency is the lowest uncore frequency supported by the operating system. This option has die scope.

--max-uncore-freq-limit

Get max. supported uncore frequency. Maximum supported uncore frequency is the highest uncore frequency supported by the operating system. This option has die scope.

--hwp

Get current setting for hardware power management. When hardware power management is enabled, CPUs can automatically scale their frequency without active OS involvement. This option has global scope.

--epp

Get EPP (via sysfs). Energy Performance Preference is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EPP value is a number in range of 0-255 (maximum energy efficiency to maximum performance), or a policy name. The value is read from or written to the 'energy_performance_preference' Linux sysfs file. This option has CPU scope.

--epp-hw

Get EPP (via MSR 0x774). Energy Performance Preference is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EPP value is a number in range of 0-255 (maximum energy efficiency to maximum performance). When package control is enabled the value is read from MSR 0x772, but when written package control is disabled and value is written to MSR 0x774, both require the 'msr' Linux kernel driver. This option has CPU scope.

--epb

Get EPB (via sysfs). Energy Performance Bias is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EBP value is a number in range of 0-15 (maximum performance to maximum energy efficiency), or a policy name. The value is read from or written to the 'energy_perf_bias' Linux sysfs file. This option has CPU scope.

--epb-hw

Get EPB (via MSR 0x1b0). Energy Performance Bias is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EBP value is a number in range of 0-15 (maximum performance to maximum energy efficiency). The value is read from or written to MSR 0x1b0, which requires the 'msr' Linux kernel driver. This option has CPU scope.

--driver

Get CPU frequency driver. CPU frequency driver enumerates and requests the P-states available on the platform. This option has global scope.

--intel-pstate-mode

Get operation mode of 'intel_pstate' driver. The 'intel_pstate' driver has 3 operation modes: 'active', 'passive' and 'off'. The main difference between the active and passive mode is in what frequency governors are used - the generic Linux governors (passive mode) or the custom, built-in 'intel_pstate' driver governors (active mode). This option has global scope.

--governor

Get CPU frequency governor. CPU frequency governor decides which P-state to select on a CPU depending on CPU business and other factors. This option has CPU scope.

COMMAND 'pepc pstates config'

usage: pepc pstates config [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--min-freq [MIN_FREQ]] [--max-freq [MAX_FREQ]] [--min-freq-hw [MIN_FREQ_HW]] [--max-freq-hw [MAX_FREQ_HW]] [--turbo [TURBO]]
                          [--min-uncore-freq [MIN_UNCORE_FREQ]] [--max-uncore-freq [MAX_UNCORE_FREQ]] [--epp [EPP]] [--epp-hw [EPP_HW]] [--epb [EPB]] [--epb-hw [EPB_HW]] [--intel-pstate-mode [INTEL_PSTATE_MODE]] [--governor [GOVERNOR]]

Configure P-states on specified CPUs. All options can be used without a parameter, in which case the currently configured value(s) will be printed.

OPTIONS 'pepc pstates config'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to configure P-States on. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to configure P-States on. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to configure P-States on. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all packages.

--min-freq [MIN_FREQ]

Set min. CPU frequency. Minimum CPU frequency is the lowest frequency the operating system configured the CPU to run at (via sysfs knobs). The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "hfm", "base", "P1" - base CPU frequency, "max" - maximum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs), "eff", "lfm", "Pn" - maximum CPU efficiency frequency. This option has CPU scope.

--max-freq [MAX_FREQ]

Set max. CPU frequency. Maximum CPU frequency is the highest frequency the operating system configured the CPU to run at (via sysfs knobs). The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "hfm", "base", "P1" - base CPU frequency, "max" - maximum CPU frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs), "eff", "lfm", "Pn" - maximum CPU efficiency frequency. This option has CPU scope.

--min-freq-hw [MIN_FREQ_HW]

Set min. CPU frequency (OS bypass). Minimum frequency the CPU is configured by the OS to run at. This value is read directly from the MSR(s), bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--max-freq-hw [MAX_FREQ_HW]

Set max. CPU frequency (OS bypass). Maximum frequency the CPU is configured by the OS to run at. This value is read directly from the MSR(s), bypassing the OS. This option has CPU scope.

--turbo [TURBO]

Enable or disable turbo. When turbo is enabled, the CPUs can automatically run at a frequency greater than base frequency. Turbo on/off status is acquired and modified via sysfs knobs. Use "on" or "off". This option has global scope.

--min-uncore-freq [MIN_UNCORE_FREQ]

Set min. uncore frequency. Minimum uncore frequency is the lowest frequency the operating system configured the uncore to run at. The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "max" - maximum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs). This option has die scope.

--max-uncore-freq [MAX_UNCORE_FREQ]

Set max. uncore frequency. Maximum uncore frequency is the highest frequency the operating system configured the uncore to run at. The default unit is "Hz", but "kHz", "MHz", and "GHz" can also be used (for example "900MHz"). The following special values are supported: "min" - minimum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs files), "max" - maximum uncore frequency supported by the OS (via Linux sysfs). This option has die scope.

--epp [EPP]

Set EPP (via sysfs). Energy Performance Preference is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EPP value is a number in range of 0-255 (maximum energy efficiency to maximum performance), or a policy name. The value is read from or written to the 'energy_performance_preference' Linux sysfs file. This option has CPU scope.

--epp-hw [EPP_HW]

Set EPP (via MSR 0x774). Energy Performance Preference is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EPP value is a number in range of 0-255 (maximum energy efficiency to maximum performance). When package control is enabled the value is read from MSR 0x772, but when written package control is disabled and value is written to MSR 0x774, both require the 'msr' Linux kernel driver. This option has CPU scope.

--epb [EPB]

Set EPB (via sysfs). Energy Performance Bias is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EBP value is a number in range of 0-15 (maximum performance to maximum energy efficiency), or a policy name. The value is read from or written to the 'energy_perf_bias' Linux sysfs file. This option has CPU scope.

--epb-hw [EPB_HW]

Set EPB (via MSR 0x1b0). Energy Performance Bias is a hint to the CPU on energy efficiency vs performance. EBP value is a number in range of 0-15 (maximum performance to maximum energy efficiency). The value is read from or written to MSR 0x1b0, which requires the 'msr' Linux kernel driver. This option has CPU scope.

--intel-pstate-mode [INTEL_PSTATE_MODE]

Set operation mode of 'intel_pstate' driver. The 'intel_pstate' driver has 3 operation modes: 'active', 'passive' and 'off'. The main difference between the active and passive mode is in what frequency governors are used - the generic Linux governors (passive mode) or the custom, built-in 'intel_pstate' driver governors (active mode). This option has global scope.

--governor [GOVERNOR]

Set CPU frequency governor. CPU frequency governor decides which P-state to select on a CPU depending on CPU business and other factors. This option has CPU scope.

COMMAND 'pepc pstates save'

usage: pepc pstates save [-h] [-q] [-d] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [-o OUTFILE]

Save all the modifiable P-state settings into a file. This file can later be used for restoring P-state settings with the 'pepc pstates restore' command.

OPTIONS 'pepc pstates save'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to save P-state information about. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to save P-state information about. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to save P-state information about. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword

-o OUTFILE, --outfile OUTFILE

Name of the file to save the settings to (printed to standard output by default).

COMMAND 'pepc pstates restore'

usage: pepc pstates restore [-h] [-q] [-d] [-f INFILE]

Restore P-state settings from a file previously created with the 'pepc pstates save' command.

OPTIONS 'pepc pstates restore'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

-f INFILE, --from INFILE

Name of the file restore the settings from (use "-" to read from the standard output.

COMMAND 'pepc aspm'

usage: pepc aspm [-h] [-q] [-d] {info,config} ...

Manage Active State Power Management configuration.

OPTIONS 'pepc aspm'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

FURTHER SUB-COMMANDS 'pepc aspm'

pepc aspm info

Get PCI ASPM information.

pepc aspm config

Change PCI ASPM configuration.

COMMAND 'pepc aspm info'

usage: pepc aspm info [-h] [-q] [-d]

Get information about current PCI ASPM configuration.

OPTIONS 'pepc aspm info'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

COMMAND 'pepc aspm config'

usage: pepc aspm config [-h] [-q] [-d] [--policy [POLICY]]

Change PCI ASPM configuration.

OPTIONS 'pepc aspm config'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--policy [POLICY]

the PCI ASPM policy to set, use "default" to set the Linux default policy.

COMMAND 'pepc topology'

usage: pepc topology [-h] [-q] [-d] {info} ...

Various commands related to CPU topology.

OPTIONS 'pepc topology'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

FURTHER SUB-COMMANDS 'pepc topology'

pepc topology info

Print CPU topology.

COMMAND 'pepc topology info'

usage: pepc topology info [-h] [-q] [-d] [--order ORDER] [--cpus CPUS] [--cores CORES] [--packages PACKAGES] [--online-only] [--columns COLUMNS]

Print CPU topology information. Note, the topology information for some offline CPUs may be unavailable, in these cases the number will be substituted with "?".

OPTIONS 'pepc topology info'

-h

Show this help message and exit.

-q

Be quiet.

-d

Print debugging information.

--order ORDER

By default, the topology table is printed in CPU number order. Use this option to print it in a different order (e.g., core or package number order). Here are the supported order names: cpu, core, module, die, node, package.

--cpus CPUS

List of CPUs to print topology information for. The list can include individual CPU numbers and CPU number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean CPUs 1 to 4, CPUs 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all CPUs. If the CPUs/cores/packages were not specified, all CPUs will be used as the default value.

--cores CORES

List of cores to print topology information for. The list can include individual core numbers and core number ranges. For example, '1-4,7,8,10-12' would mean cores 1 to 4, cores 7, 8, and 10 to 12. Use the special keyword 'all' to specify all cores.

--packages PACKAGES

List of packages to print topology information for. The list can include individual package numbers and package number ranges. For example, '1-3' would mean packages 1 to 3, and '1,3' would mean packages 1 and 3. Use the special keyword

--online-only

Include only online CPUs. By default offline and online CPUs are included.

--columns COLUMNS

By default, the topology columns are CPU, core, module, die, node, package. Use this option to select topology columns names and order (e.g.,'--columns Package,Core,CPU').

Authors

Artem Bityutskiy
dedekind1@gmail.com

Distribution

The latest version of pepc may be downloaded from https://github.com/intel/pepc

Info

2023-01-09 Generated Python Manual