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pbmtextps - Man Page

render text into a PBM image using a postscript interpreter

Examples (TL;DR)

Synopsis

pbmtextps [-font fontname] [-fontsize float] [-resolution n] [-leftmargin=n] [-rightmargin=n] [-topmargin=n] [-bottommargin=n] [-ascent=n] [-descent=n] [-pad] [-crop] [-stroke n] [-asciihex] [-ascii85] [-verbose] [-dump-ps] text [text ...]

Description

This program is part of Netpbm(1).

pbmtextps takes a single line of text from the command line and renders it into a PBM image.  The image is of a single line of text; newline characters in the input have no effect.

See pbmtext for a more sophisticated generator of text, but using less common font formats.  pbmtext can generate multiple lines of text.

The -plain common option has no effect before Netpbm 10.42 (March 2008).  The output is always raw PBM.

Margins

By default, the image is cropped at the top and the right.  It is not cropped at the left or bottom so that the text begins at the same position relative to the origin.  The size of the default left and bottom margins is explained below.

You can set whatever margin you want with options -leftmargin, -rightmargin, -topmargin and -bottommargin.  The specified amount of white space gets added to the far edge of type, e.g. if you specify 10 points for -topmargin, you will get 10 points of white space above the highest character on the line. Specify 0 to crop a side.

-ascent adds white space to the top to reach a specified distance above the text baseline, and -descent adds white space to to the bottom to reach a specified distance below the text baseline.

-ascent and -descent are more useful than -topmargin and -bottomargin when you render two pieces of text (in separate invocations of pbmtextps) that you will concatenate horizontally. With -ascent and -descent, as long as you specify a value greater than the height or detph of every character in the font, the two images will be the same height with the text baseline in the same place. With -topmargin and -bottommargin, that may not be the case.

Example:

     $ pbmtextps -font=Times-Roman -descent=20 \
          'The soup is called' > a1.pbm
     $ pbmtextps -font=Itallic -descent=20 'Goulash.' > a2.pbm
     $ pnmcat -leftright -jbottom a1.pbm a2.pbm > out.pbm

If you're using -descent to line up the segments of text you are
 concatenating horizontally with pnmcat, use the -jbottom
 (justify to bottom) option on pnmcat as in the example above.  If you
 use -ascent, use -jtop instead.

Similarly, if you render two lines of text (in separate invocations of
 pbmtextps) that you will concatenate vertically, -ascent and
 -descent with sufficiently large values will ensure your baselines
 are uniformly spaced.

If you have -ascent, there is probably no point in specifying -topmargin too, but if you do, the effect is cumulative.  The same is true of -descent and -bottommargin.

-pad pads the image on the top and bottom to the where the highest and lowest characters in the font would reach, even if you don't have those characters in your text.  This is useful if you will generate multiple images of text (with multiple invocations of pbmtextps) and concatenate them vertically to create a multiline text image.  -pad makes sure the lines in this image are equally spaced.

Example:

    $ pbmtextps 'cat'   | pamfile
    $ pbmtextps 'Catty' | pamfile

The commands above, with no -pad, show that the 'Catty' image is higher because capital C reaches high and 'y' reaches low.

    $ pbmtextps -pad 'cat'   | pamfile
    $ pbmtextps -pad 'Catty' | pamfile

The commands above, with -pad, show that both images are the same height.

If you specify -pad with -ascent or -descent, the larger value is effective.

-crop makes the program crop all sides to the far edge of the type. It is the same as -leftmargin=0 -rightmargin=0 -topmargin=0 -bottommargin=0.

You cannot specify any other margin-affecting options with -crop.

The default top margin, when you specify neither -ascent, -topmargin, nor -pad, is as if you specified topmargin=0.

The default bottom margin, when you specify neither -descent, -bottommargin, nor -pad, is as if you specified -descent=1.5*fontsize.

The default left margin, when you do not specify -leftmargin, is as if you specified -leftmargin=0.5*fontsize.

The default right margin, when you do not specify -rightmargin, is as if you specified -rightmargin=0.

<h3 id="input_text">Input Text</h2>

The simplest way to specify the text to render is just to specify it,
 in ASCII, as the sole argument of the command.  For example,

    
  $ pbmtextps 'hello world'

But you can also spread it across multiple arguments.  pbmtextps
 concatenates them right to left with a single space in between:
 

    
  $ pbmtextps hello world

With an -asciihex option, you can specify the text in Postscript&apos;s ASCII-HEX code:
 

    
  $ pbmtextps -asciihex 68656c6c6f20776f726c64

You can optionally include the ASCII-HEX text delimiters that would appear around the text in a Postscript program:

    
  $ pbmtextps -asciihex '<68656c6c6f20776f726c64>'

Note that the <> delimiters have special meaning to command shells, so if you are invoking pbmtextps via a command shell, be sure to quote them, as is done in this example.
 

With -asciihex, you can include white space anywhere in the coded text; it has no effect.  And you can spread the argument across multiple arguments as for plain ASCII input:

    
  $ pbmtextps -asciihex '<' 68656c6c6f 20 776f726c64 '>'

But note that while Postscript allows an ASCII NUL character as white
 space, there is no way to pass an argument including a NUL character to
 pbmtextps.
 

With an -ascii85 option, you can specify the text in Postscript&apos;s ASCII-85 code.  This is analogous to -asciihex.  The Postscript delimiters for an ASCII-85 text string are <~ ~>.

 

Options

In addition to the options common to all programs based on libnetpbm (most notably -quiet, see Common Options ), pbmtextps recognizes the following command line options:

-font=fontname

This specifies the font to use.  fontname is the name of any valid Postscript font which is installed on the system.

The default is TimesRoman.

Here is a way to get a list of the names of all the available fonts:

        $ gs -c &apos;(*) {==} 256 string /Font resourceforall&apos;

Warning: if fontname does not name a valid font, pbmtextps just uses the default font.  It does not tell you it is doing this.

-fontsize=float

This is the size of the font in points.  See the -resolution option for information on how to interpret this size.

The default is 24 points.

Before Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016), this has to be a whole number.

-resolution=n

This is the resolution in dots per inch of distance measurements pertaining to generation of the image.  PBM images don't have any inherent resolution, so a distance such as "1 inch" doesn't mean anything unless you separately specify what resolution you're talking about.  That's what this option does.

In particular, the meaning of the font size is determined by this resolution.  If the font size is 24 points and the resolution is 150 dpi, then the font size is 50 pixels.

The default is 150 dpi.

-leftmargin=n
-rightmargin=n
-topmargin=n
-bottommargin=n

These options control the margins added to the image, measured from the far edge of the type.  See Margins for details.

All sizes are in points, as a floating point number.

These options were new in Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016).

-ascent=n
-descent=n

These options control the margins added to the image, measured from the text baseline.  See Margins for details.

Sizes are in points, as a floating point number.

These options were new in Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016).

-pad

This pads the image on the top and bottom to the where the highest and lowest characters in the font would reach, even if you don't have those characters in your text.  See Margins for details.

This option was new in Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016).

-crop

This makes the program crop all sides to the far edge of the type.  It is the same as -leftmargin=0 -rightmargin=0 -topmargin=0 -bottommargin=0. See Margins for details.

This option was new in Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016).

-asciihex

This means the text in the arguments is in Postscript ASCII-HEX code. See Input Text .

You cannot specify this together with -ascii85.

This option was new in Netpbm 11.02 (March 2023)

-ascii85

This means the text in the arguments is in Postscript ASCII-85 code. See Input Text .

You cannot specify this together with -asciihex.

This option was new in Netpbm 11.02 (March 2023)
 

-stroke=n

This is the width of line, in points, to use for stroke font.  There is no default stroke width because the characters are solid by default.

-verbose

This option makes pbmtextps display extra information on Standard Error about its processing.

-dump-ps

This option makes pbmtextps write to Standard Output the Postscript program it would use to create the image, rather than the image itself.  You can use this as input to a Postscript interpreter (such as Ghostscript or a printer) or to understand the program better.

This option was new in Netpbm 10.75 (June 2016).

Usage

You can generate antialiased text by using a larger resolution than the default and scaling the image down using pamscale.

See the manual for the similar pbmtext for more advice on usage.

History

pbmtextps was added to Netpbm in Release 10.0 (June 2002).

See Also

pbmtext(1), pamcut(1), pnmcrop(1), pamcomp(1), ppmchange(1), pnmrotate(1), pamscale(1), ppmlabel(1), pbm(1)

Author

Copyright (C) 2002 by James McCann

Document Source

This manual page was generated by the Netpbm tool 'makeman' from HTML source.  The master documentation is at

http://netpbm.sourceforge.net/doc/pbmtextps.html

Referenced By

pbmtext(1), ppmlabel(1).

17 February 2023 netpbm documentation