mysqlbinlog - Man Page

utility for processing binary log files

Synopsis

mysqlbinlog [options] log_file ...

Description

The server's binary log consists of files containing “events” that describe modifications to database contents. The server writes these files in binary format. To display their contents in text format, use the mysqlbinlog utility. You can also use mysqlbinlog to display the contents of relay log files written by a slave server in a replication setup because relay logs have the same format as binary logs. The binary log and relay log are discussed further in Section 5.4.4, “The Binary Log”, and Section 17.2.4, “Replication Relay and Status Logs”.

Invoke mysqlbinlog like this:

shell> mysqlbinlog [options] log_file ...

For example, to display the contents of the binary log file named binlog.000003, use this command:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.0000003

The output includes events contained in binlog.000003. For statement-based logging, event information includes the SQL statement, the ID of the server on which it was executed, the timestamp when the statement was executed, how much time it took, and so forth. For row-based logging, the event indicates a row change rather than an SQL statement. See Section 17.2.1, “Replication Formats”, for information about logging modes.

Events are preceded by header comments that provide additional information. For example:

# at 141
#100309  9:28:36 server id 123  end_log_pos 245
  Query thread_id=3350  exec_time=11  error_code=0

In the first line, the number following at indicates the file offset, or starting position, of the event in the binary log file.

The second line starts with a date and time indicating when the statement started on the server where the event originated. For replication, this timestamp is propagated to slave servers. server id is the server_id value of the server where the event originated. end_log_pos indicates where the next event starts (that is, it is the end position of the current event + 1). thread_id indicates which thread executed the event. exec_time is the time spent executing the event, on a master server. On a slave, it is the difference of the end execution time on the slave minus the beginning execution time on the master. The difference serves as an indicator of how much replication lags behind the master. error_code indicates the result from executing the event. Zero means that no error occurred.

Note

When using event groups, the file offsets of events may be grouped together and the comments of events may be grouped together. Do not mistake these grouped events for blank file offsets.

The output from mysqlbinlog can be re-executed (for example, by using it as input to mysql) to redo the statements in the log. This is useful for recovery operations after a server crash. For other usage examples, see the discussion later in this section and in Section 7.5, “Point-in-Time (Incremental) Recovery Using the Binary Log”. To execute the internal-use BINLOG statements used by mysqlbinlog, the user requires the BINLOG_ADMIN or SUPER privilege, or the REPLICATION_APPLIER privilege plus the appropriate privileges to execute each log event.

You can use mysqlbinlog to read binary log files directly and apply them to the local MySQL server. You can also read binary logs from a remote server by using the --read-from-remote-server option. To read remote binary logs, the connection parameter options can be given to indicate how to connect to the server. These options are --host, --password, --port, --protocol, --socket, and --user.

When binary log files have been encrypted, which can be done from MySQL 8.0.14 onwards, mysqlbinlog cannot read them directly, but can read them from the server using the --read-from-remote-server option. Binary log files are encrypted when the server's binlog_encryption system variable is set to ON. The SHOW BINARY LOGS statement shows whether a particular binary log file is encrypted or unencrypted. Encrypted and unencrypted binary log files can also be distinguished using the magic number at the start of the file header for encrypted log files (0xFD62696E), which differs from that used for unencrypted log files (0xFE62696E). Note that from MySQL 8.0.14, mysqlbinlog returns a suitable error if you attempt to read an encrypted binary log file directly, but older versions of mysqlbinlog do not recognise the file as a binary log file at all. For more information on binary log encryption, see Section 17.3.2, “Encrypting Binary Log Files and Relay Log Files”.

When running mysqlbinlog against a large binary log, be careful that the filesystem has enough space for the resulting files. To configure the directory that mysqlbinlog uses for temporary files, use the TMPDIR environment variable.

mysqlbinlog sets the value of pseudo_slave_mode to true before executing any SQL statements. This system variable affects the handling of XA transactions, the original_commit_timestamp replication delay timestamp and the original_server_version system variable, and unsupported SQL modes.

mysqlbinlog supports the following options, which can be specified on the command line or in the [mysqlbinlog] and [client] groups of an option file. For information about option files used by MySQL programs, see Section 4.2.2.2, “Using Option Files”.

  • --database=db_name, -d db_name

    This option causes mysqlbinlog to output entries from the binary log (local log only) that occur while db_name is been selected as the default database by USE.

    The --database option for mysqlbinlog is similar to the --binlog-do-db option for mysqld, but can be used to specify only one database. If --database is given multiple times, only the last instance is used.

    The effects of this option depend on whether the statement-based or row-based logging format is in use, in the same way that the effects of --binlog-do-db depend on whether statement-based or row-based logging is in use.

Statement-based logging. The --database option works as follows:

  • While db_name is the default database, statements are output whether they modify tables in db_name or a different database.
  • Unless db_name is selected as the default database, statements are not output, even if they modify tables in db_name.
  • There is an exception for CREATE DATABASE, ALTER DATABASE, and DROP DATABASE. The database being created, altered, or dropped is considered to be the default database when determining whether to output the statement.

Suppose that the binary log was created by executing these statements using statement-based-logging:

INSERT INTO test.t1 (i) VALUES(100);
INSERT INTO db2.t2 (j)  VALUES(200);
USE test;
INSERT INTO test.t1 (i) VALUES(101);
INSERT INTO t1 (i)      VALUES(102);
INSERT INTO db2.t2 (j)  VALUES(201);
USE db2;
INSERT INTO test.t1 (i) VALUES(103);
INSERT INTO db2.t2 (j)  VALUES(202);
INSERT INTO t2 (j)      VALUES(203);

mysqlbinlog --database=test does not output the first two INSERT statements because there is no default database. It outputs the three INSERT statements following USE test, but not the three INSERT statements following USE db2.

mysqlbinlog --database=db2 does not output the first two INSERT statements because there is no default database. It does not output the three INSERT statements following USE test, but does output the three INSERT statements following USE db2.

Row-based logging. mysqlbinlog outputs only entries that change tables belonging to db_name. The default database has no effect on this. Suppose that the binary log just described was created using row-based logging rather than statement-based logging. mysqlbinlog --database=test outputs only those entries that modify t1 in the test database, regardless of whether USE was issued or what the default database is. If a server is running with binlog_format set to MIXED and you want it to be possible to use mysqlbinlog with the --database option, you must ensure that tables that are modified are in the database selected by USE. (In particular, no cross-database updates should be used.)

When used together with the --rewrite-db option, the --rewrite-db option is applied first; then the --database option is applied, using the rewritten database name. The order in which the options are provided makes no difference in this regard.

You can pipe the output of mysqlbinlog into the mysql client to execute the events contained in the binary log. This technique is used to recover from a crash when you have an old backup (see Section 7.5, “Point-in-Time (Incremental) Recovery Using the Binary Log”). For example:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000001 | mysql -u root -p

Or:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.[0-9]* | mysql -u root -p

If the statements produced by mysqlbinlog may contain BLOB values, these may cause problems when mysql processes them. In this case, invoke mysql with the --binary-mode option.

You can also redirect the output of mysqlbinlog to a text file instead, if you need to modify the statement log first (for example, to remove statements that you do not want to execute for some reason). After editing the file, execute the statements that it contains by using it as input to the mysql program:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000001 > tmpfile
shell> ... edit tmpfile ...
shell> mysql -u root -p < tmpfile

When mysqlbinlog is invoked with the --start-position option, it displays only those events with an offset in the binary log greater than or equal to a given position (the given position must match the start of one event). It also has options to stop and start when it sees an event with a given date and time. This enables you to perform point-in-time recovery using the --stop-datetime option (to be able to say, for example, “roll forward my databases to how they were today at 10:30 a.m.”).

Processing multiple files. If you have more than one binary log to execute on the MySQL server, the safe method is to process them all using a single connection to the server. Here is an example that demonstrates what may be unsafe:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000001 | mysql -u root -p # DANGER!!
shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000002 | mysql -u root -p # DANGER!!

Processing binary logs this way using multiple connections to the server causes problems if the first log file contains a CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE statement and the second log contains a statement that uses the temporary table. When the first mysql process terminates, the server drops the temporary table. When the second mysql process attempts to use the table, the server reports “unknown table.”

To avoid problems like this, use a single mysql process to execute the contents of all binary logs that you want to process. Here is one way to do so:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000001 binlog.000002 | mysql -u root -p

Another approach is to write all the logs to a single file and then process the file:

shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000001 >  /tmp/statements.sql
shell> mysqlbinlog binlog.000002 >> /tmp/statements.sql
shell> mysql -u root -p -e "source /tmp/statements.sql"

From MySQL 8.0.12, you can also supply multiple binary log files to mysqlbinlog as streamed input using a shell pipe. An archive of compressed binary log files can be decompressed and provided directly to mysqlbinlog. In this example, binlog-files_1.gz contains multiple binary log files for processing. The pipeline extracts the contents of binlog-files_1.gz, pipes the binary log files to mysqlbinlog as standard input, and pipes the output of mysqlbinlog into the mysql client for execution:

shell> gzip -cd binlog-files_1.gz | ./mysqlbinlog - | ./mysql -uroot  -p

You can specify more than one archive file, for example:

shell> gzip -cd binlog-files_1.gz binlog-files_2.gz | ./mysqlbinlog - | ./mysql -uroot  -p

For streamed input, do not use --stop-position, because mysqlbinlog cannot identify the last log file to apply this option.

LOAD DATA operations. mysqlbinlog can produce output that reproduces a LOAD DATA operation without the original data file. mysqlbinlog copies the data to a temporary file and writes a LOAD DATA LOCAL statement that refers to the file. The default location of the directory where these files are written is system-specific. To specify a directory explicitly, use the --local-load option.

Because mysqlbinlog converts LOAD DATA statements to LOAD DATA LOCAL statements (that is, it adds LOCAL), both the client and the server that you use to process the statements must be configured with the LOCAL capability enabled. See Section 6.1.6, “Security Issues with LOAD DATA LOCAL”.

Warning

The temporary files created for LOAD DATA LOCAL statements are not automatically deleted because they are needed until you actually execute those statements. You should delete the temporary files yourself after you no longer need the statement log. The files can be found in the temporary file directory and have names like original_file_name-#-#.

Mysqlbinlog Hex Dump Format

The --hexdump option causes mysqlbinlog to produce a hex dump of the binary log contents:

shell> mysqlbinlog --hexdump master-bin.000001

The hex output consists of comment lines beginning with #, so the output might look like this for the preceding command:

/*!40019 SET @@SESSION.max_insert_delayed_threads=0*/;
/*!50003 SET @OLD_COMPLETION_TYPE=@@COMPLETION_TYPE,COMPLETION_TYPE=0*/;
# at 4
#051024 17:24:13 server id 1  end_log_pos 98
# Position  Timestamp   Type   Master ID        Size      Master Pos    Flags
# 00000004 9d fc 5c 43   0f   01 00 00 00   5e 00 00 00   62 00 00 00   00 00
# 00000017 04 00 35 2e 30 2e 31 35  2d 64 65 62 75 67 2d 6c |..5.0.15.debug.l|
# 00000027 6f 67 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |og..............|
# 00000037 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |................|
# 00000047 00 00 00 00 9d fc 5c 43  13 38 0d 00 08 00 12 00 |.......C.8......|
# 00000057 04 04 04 04 12 00 00 4b  00 04 1a                |.......K...|
#       Start: binlog v 4, server v 5.0.15-debug-log created 051024 17:24:13
#       at startup
ROLLBACK;

Hex dump output currently contains the elements in the following list. This format is subject to change. For more information about binary log format, see MySQL Internals: The Binary Log[1].

Mysqlbinlog Row Event Display

The following examples illustrate how mysqlbinlog displays row events that specify data modifications. These correspond to events with the WRITE_ROWS_EVENT, UPDATE_ROWS_EVENT, and DELETE_ROWS_EVENT type codes. The --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS and --verbose options may be used to affect row event output.

Suppose that the server is using row-based binary logging and that you execute the following sequence of statements:

CREATE TABLE t
(
  id   INT NOT NULL,
  name VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
  date DATE NULL
) ENGINE = InnoDB;
START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO t VALUES(1, 'apple', NULL);
UPDATE t SET name = 'pear', date = '2009-01-01' WHERE id = 1;
DELETE FROM t WHERE id = 1;
COMMIT;

By default, mysqlbinlog displays row events encoded as base-64 strings using BINLOG statements. Omitting extraneous lines, the output for the row events produced by the preceding statement sequence looks like this:

shell> mysqlbinlog log_file
...
# at 218
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 258   Write_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAANoAAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBcBAAAAKAAAAAIBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//8AQAAAAVhcHBsZQ==
'/*!*/;
...
# at 302
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 356   Update_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAC4BAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBgBAAAANgAAAGQBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA////AEAAAAFYXBwbGX4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;
...
# at 400
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 442   Delete_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAJABAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBkBAAAAKgAAALoBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;

To see the row events as comments in the form of “pseudo-SQL” statements, run mysqlbinlog with the --verbose or -v option. This output level also shows table partition information where applicable. The output will contain lines beginning with ###:

shell> mysqlbinlog -v log_file
...
# at 218
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 258   Write_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAANoAAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBcBAAAAKAAAAAIBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//8AQAAAAVhcHBsZQ==
'/*!*/;
### INSERT INTO test.t
### SET
###   @1=1
###   @2='apple'
###   @3=NULL
...
# at 302
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 356   Update_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAC4BAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBgBAAAANgAAAGQBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA////AEAAAAFYXBwbGX4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;
### UPDATE test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1
###   @2='apple'
###   @3=NULL
### SET
###   @1=1
###   @2='pear'
###   @3='2009:01:01'
...
# at 400
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 442   Delete_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAJABAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBkBAAAAKgAAALoBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;
### DELETE FROM test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1
###   @2='pear'
###   @3='2009:01:01'

Specify --verbose or -v twice to also display data types and some metadata for each column, and informational log events such as row query log events if the binlog_rows_query_log_events system variable is set to TRUE. The output will contain an additional comment following each column change:

shell> mysqlbinlog -vv log_file
...
# at 218
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 258   Write_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAANoAAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBcBAAAAKAAAAAIBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//8AQAAAAVhcHBsZQ==
'/*!*/;
### INSERT INTO test.t
### SET
###   @1=1 /* INT meta=0 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @2='apple' /* VARSTRING(20) meta=20 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @3=NULL /* VARSTRING(20) meta=0 nullable=1 is_null=1 */
...
# at 302
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 356   Update_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAC4BAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBgBAAAANgAAAGQBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA////AEAAAAFYXBwbGX4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;
### UPDATE test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1 /* INT meta=0 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @2='apple' /* VARSTRING(20) meta=20 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @3=NULL /* VARSTRING(20) meta=0 nullable=1 is_null=1 */
### SET
###   @1=1 /* INT meta=0 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @2='pear' /* VARSTRING(20) meta=20 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @3='2009:01:01' /* DATE meta=0 nullable=1 is_null=0 */
...
# at 400
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 442   Delete_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
BINLOG '
fAS3SBMBAAAALAAAAJABAAAAABEAAAAAAAAABHRlc3QAAXQAAwMPCgIUAAQ=
fAS3SBkBAAAAKgAAALoBAAAQABEAAAAAAAEAA//4AQAAAARwZWFyIbIP
'/*!*/;
### DELETE FROM test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1 /* INT meta=0 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @2='pear' /* VARSTRING(20) meta=20 nullable=0 is_null=0 */
###   @3='2009:01:01' /* DATE meta=0 nullable=1 is_null=0 */

You can tell mysqlbinlog to suppress the BINLOG statements for row events by using the --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS option. This is similar to --base64-output=NEVER but does not exit with an error if a row event is found. The combination of --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS and --verbose provides a convenient way to see row events only as SQL statements:

shell> mysqlbinlog -v --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS log_file
...
# at 218
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 258   Write_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
### INSERT INTO test.t
### SET
###   @1=1
###   @2='apple'
###   @3=NULL
...
# at 302
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 356   Update_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
### UPDATE test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1
###   @2='apple'
###   @3=NULL
### SET
###   @1=1
###   @2='pear'
###   @3='2009:01:01'
...
# at 400
#080828 15:03:08 server id 1  end_log_pos 442   Delete_rows: table id 17 flags: STMT_END_F
### DELETE FROM test.t
### WHERE
###   @1=1
###   @2='pear'
###   @3='2009:01:01'

Note

You should not suppress BINLOG statements if you intend to re-execute mysqlbinlog output.

The SQL statements produced by --verbose for row events are much more readable than the corresponding BINLOG statements. However, they do not correspond exactly to the original SQL statements that generated the events. The following limitations apply:

Proper interpretation of row events requires the information from the format description event at the beginning of the binary log. Because mysqlbinlog does not know in advance whether the rest of the log contains row events, by default it displays the format description event using a BINLOG statement in the initial part of the output.

If the binary log is known not to contain any events requiring a BINLOG statement (that is, no row events), the --base64-output=NEVER option can be used to prevent this header from being written.

Using Mysqlbinlog to Back Up Binary Log Files

By default, mysqlbinlog reads binary log files and displays their contents in text format. This enables you to examine events within the files more easily and to re-execute them (for example, by using the output as input to mysql). mysqlbinlog can read log files directly from the local file system, or, with the --read-from-remote-server option, it can connect to a server and request binary log contents from that server. mysqlbinlog writes text output to its standard output, or to the file named as the value of the --result-file=file_name option if that option is given.

mysqlbinlog Backup Capabilities

mysqlbinlog can read binary log files and write new files containing the same content—that is, in binary format rather than text format. This capability enables you to easily back up a binary log in its original format. mysqlbinlog can make a static backup, backing up a set of log files and stopping when the end of the last file is reached. It can also make a continuous (“live”) backup, staying connected to the server when it reaches the end of the last log file and continuing to copy new events as they are generated. In continuous-backup operation, mysqlbinlog runs until the connection ends (for example, when the server exits) or mysqlbinlog is forcibly terminated. When the connection ends, mysqlbinlog does not wait and retry the connection, unlike a slave replication server. To continue a live backup after the server has been restarted, you must also restart mysqlbinlog.

Important

mysqlbinlog can back up both encrypted and unencrypted binary log files . However, copies of encrypted binary log files that are generated using mysqlbinlog are stored in an unencrypted format.

mysqlbinlog Backup Options

Binary log backup requires that you invoke mysqlbinlog with two options at minimum:

Along with --read-from-remote-server, it is common to specify other options: --host indicates where the server is running, and you may also need to specify connection options such as --user and --password.

Several other options are useful in conjunction with --raw:

Static and Live Backups

To back up a server's binary log files with mysqlbinlog, you must specify file names that actually exist on the server. If you do not know the names, connect to the server and use the SHOW BINARY LOGS statement to see the current names. Suppose that the statement produces this output:

mysql> SHOW BINARY LOGS;
+---------------+-----------+-----------+
| Log_name      | File_size | Encrypted |
+---------------+-----------+-----------+
| binlog.000130 |     27459 | No        |
| binlog.000131 |     13719 | No        |
| binlog.000132 |     43268 | No        |
+---------------+-----------+-----------+

With that information, you can use mysqlbinlog to back up the binary log to the current directory as follows (enter each command on a single line):

Output File Naming

Without --raw, mysqlbinlog produces text output and the --result-file option, if given, specifies the name of the single file to which all output is written. With --raw, mysqlbinlog writes one binary output file for each log file transferred from the server. By default, mysqlbinlog writes the files in the current directory with the same names as the original log files. To modify the output file names, use the --result-file option. In conjunction with --raw, the --result-file option value is treated as a prefix that modifies the output file names.

Suppose that a server currently has binary log files named binlog.000999 and up. If you use mysqlbinlog --raw to back up the files, the --result-file option produces output file names as shown in the following table. You can write the files to a specific directory by beginning the --result-file value with the directory path. If the --result-file value consists only of a directory name, the value must end with the pathname separator character. Output files are overwritten if they exist.

--result-file OptionOutput File Names
--result-file=xxbinlog.000999 and up
--result-file=/tmp//tmp/binlog.000999 and up
--result-file=/tmp/x/tmp/xbinlog.000999 and up

Example: mysqldump + mysqlbinlog for Backup and Restore

The following example describes a simple scenario that shows how to use mysqldump and mysqlbinlog together to back up a server's data and binary log, and how to use the backup to restore the server if data loss occurs. The example assumes that the server is running on host host_name and its first binary log file is named binlog.000999. Enter each command on a single line.

Use mysqlbinlog to make a continuous backup of the binary log:

mysqlbinlog --read-from-remote-server --host=host_name --raw
  --stop-never binlog.000999

Use mysqldump to create a dump file as a snapshot of the server's data. Use --all-databases, --events, and --routines to back up all data, and --master-data=2 to include the current binary log coordinates in the dump file.

mysqldump --host=host_name --all-databases --events --routines --master-data=2> dump_file

Execute the mysqldump command periodically to create newer snapshots as desired.

If data loss occurs (for example, if the server crashes), use the most recent dump file to restore the data:

mysql --host=host_name -u root -p < dump_file

Then use the binary log backup to re-execute events that were written after the coordinates listed in the dump file. Suppose that the coordinates in the file look like this:

-- CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_LOG_FILE='binlog.001002', MASTER_LOG_POS=27284;

If the most recent backed-up log file is named binlog.001004, re-execute the log events like this:

mysqlbinlog --start-position=27284 binlog.001002 binlog.001003 binlog.001004
  | mysql --host=host_name -u root -p

You might find it easier to copy the backup files (dump file and binary log files) to the server host to make it easier to perform the restore operation, or if MySQL does not allow remote root access. mysqlbinlog Backup Restrictions

Binary log backups with mysqlbinlog are subject to these restrictions:

Specifying the Mysqlbinlog Server Id

When invoked with the --read-from-remote-server option, mysqlbinlog connects to a MySQL server, specifies a server ID to identify itself, and requests binary log files from the server. You can use mysqlbinlog to request log files from a server in several ways:

With --read-from-remote-server only, mysqlbinlog connects using a server ID of 0, which tells the server to disconnect after sending the last requested log file.

With --read-from-remote-server and --stop-never, mysqlbinlog connects using a nonzero server ID, so the server does not disconnect after sending the last log file. The server ID is 1 by default, but this can be changed with --connection-server-id.

Thus, for the first two ways of requesting files, the server disconnects because mysqlbinlog specifies a server ID of 0. It does not disconnect if --stop-never is given because mysqlbinlog specifies a nonzero server ID.

Notes

1.

MySQL Internals: The Binary Log
https://dev.mysql.com/doc/internals/en/binary-log.html

See Also

For more information, please refer to the MySQL Reference Manual, which may already be installed locally and which is also available online at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/.

Author

Oracle Corporation (http://dev.mysql.com/).

Referenced By

The man page mariadb-binlog(1) is an alias of mysqlbinlog(1).

03/06/2020 MySQL 8.0 MySQL Database System